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  1. #21
    BrendanCarlson's Avatar
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    RPC, no big deal for me... I'm not going for perfect, I just am cheap/a poor student and need to use my chems alot.
    Everybody has a photographic memory, some just don't have film.
    My Website and Gallery is at www.bcarlsonmedia.com
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  2. #22

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    I've been doing C-41 with the press kits for about a year now. Love it.

    Here are my observations:

    Be careful what temps you develop at. Cooler (under 102f) is way better than over. Also, check your temps against more than 1 thermometer. I used a metal dial one and kept getting bad results, then started using a mercury one. The dial was a full 2 degrees off so I was developing at 104f. Hence why I know hotter is worser!

    Dark brown negatives indicates too hot developing, or too vigorous agitation. If you see any streaking around sprocket holes, you may be agitating too violently. I was. Now I just pick the tank up and swirl it around for 5 secs. My negatives have been darn near perfect ever since, coupled with the temperature revelation.

    The developer seems to be the weakest link. It goes bad long before the blix. I now use a plastic bottle and squeeze almost all the air out before recapping. That seems to help a lot. The developer will darken as it ages. If it looks blackish, it's no good.

    The stabilizer must be completely dissolved in water, use warm water to mix it. I also add Photo Flo and it helps a lot. I keep Edwal's negative cleaner nearby for the streaks or spots that come up.
    Last edited by Wolfeye; 05-29-2012 at 08:18 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  3. #23

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    Be careful if you rinse with water between Dev and Bleach as I find 'Chromogenic B&W Films' such as Ilford XP2 Super and the Fuji one ( Made by Ilford ) RETICULATE the backing coat badly and was told by Ilford Ltd NOT to rinse between Dev and Bleach.
    I only use colour C41 films, and B&W I use normal B&W films. Is there any issue here with colour film? Is there much difference between colour and B&W c41 films?

    Rinsing between developer and bleach or blix in color film development can slow and stop development in the emulsion layers at different rates, resulting in crossover. A stop bath is better.
    Same stop bath as used for B&W film and paper?

  4. #24
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    Kodak C41 films are slightly opaque until dry. The negative films are normally orange due to the color mask.

    If the film is still wet, you should not evaluate the image until dry. If a defect is found, you can always rewet, bleach, wash, fix, wash and stabilize. Usually, defects arise due to the use of a blix instead of a bleach and fix.

    PE

  5. #25

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    If a defect is found, you can always rewet, bleach, wash, fix, wash and stabilize. Usually, defects arise due to the use of a blix instead of a bleach and fix.
    I would prefer to use separate bleach and fix. I've never been much of a fan of 2 in 1 anything. I am using the Tetenal Jobo C41 power press kit. Can anyone recommend a kit for home processing which does have separate chemicals? I looked on B&H, and everything else seemed to be for commercial use in large quantities.

  6. #26
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    You missed my first paragraph. Is the film still wet? Or was it when you last examined it?

    Blix or bleach then fix may be a moot point if wetness was the problem.

    PE

  7. #27

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    You missed my first paragraph. Is the film still wet? Or was it when you last examined it?
    Yes, the film is fine once dry. I am using Kodak films, and originally posted this thread just after I pulled it from the tank with the film looking pretty bad. Once dry, it was all good.

  8. #28
    BrendanCarlson's Avatar
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    Thanks PE.
    Everybody has a photographic memory, some just don't have film.
    My Website and Gallery is at www.bcarlsonmedia.com
    My Twitter is @brendancarlson

  9. #29
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    The film referred to in the OP appears to be processed OK then. No need for anything extra. But, if you want a good bleach then fix set of chemistry the Kodak Bleach III and the Flexicolor Fix are good choices.

    The Fuji equivalents are just as good.

    PE

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