Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,478   Posts: 1,571,108   Online: 1168
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15
  1. #11
    LunoLuno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Kanagawa JAPAN
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    58
    I had thought the same way as hrst wrote when I first read OP's post, but when I found the following sentence, I thought this could be a much more simple matter. The OP said,

    "... it always has that yellow/red cast"

    Maybe he should ask the printer to correct color temperature of his prints first?

  2. #12
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,423
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    This leads us to a good rule of thumb:

    If in wrong color temperature, OVEREXPOSE by the filter factor for the filter for that particular conversion, even without the filter....
    Brilliant, and makes a lot of sense.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  3. #13

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,963
    I have hope that they continue to make film so I am not hoping for them to make reintroduce tungsten film. Like others have said, you should use a filter to correct for the color balance when you shoot daylight film under tungsten lighting. I have shot many types of color negative film without filter and trying to correct that during the printing phase. The result would look better but never good enough because one of the layer is underexposed severely to do correction in printing.

  4. #14
    hrst's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Finland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,300
    Images
    1
    If you really want to shoot indoors at good photographic speed and quality, the way to go is to buy tungsten-balanced MOVIE film stock such as Kodak Vision3 500T which uses the same technology as the new Portra 400, has great underexposure latitude, but is a bit faster and, being tungsten-balanced, is more than 2 stops faster in tungsten lightning than Portra 400. The only downside is that you cannot process them in normal C-41 process.

    I think there now is a company selling and processing 135-36 lengths of those movie films; http://www.ecn-2.com/ .

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    London
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    396
    I particularly like Portra 800 with mixed lighting.
    Mamiya RB, Rollei 6003, Hasselblad, Nikonos, Canon EOS, Leica R, Fuji Instax...and some other stuff

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin