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  1. #11
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    Randy- in the UK, cars are issued a license plate when they are first sold, and that plate stays with the vehicle for so long as the vehicle exists. So if that car still exists and hasn't been totalled in an accident or otherwise scrapped, it still bears that same plate, even if it has been sold 20 times. I don't know about inspection stickers if they issue them or how often.

  2. #12

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    Steve it might be worthwhile contacting the Leamington Courier. Even if none of its records about AP helps it might be prepared to help by running a story to excite interest from ex AP employees.

    Is there still an AP sports and social club or a core group of ex employees that still meets occasionally?

    Somebody might know who the chauffeur is and even if he is dead now, his family might have accurate memories of events.

    Best of luck

    pentaxuser

  3. #13

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    Well the registration/tax sticker in the round holder on the windscreen would date the picture if you could read the year on it. Otherwise it sure looks like a 70's door system.
    Bob

  4. #14

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    Thanks for the comments, everyone.

    The car's licence plate could be personalised, or it could be the original '30s one. There's a website called "howmantleft" that lists the number of registered vehicles for any manufacturer. According to that site there are no Packards on the roads in the UK - but there could be many in private collections. I had a pm that suggested the car could be a '50s Austin Princess, I haven't checked to see the difference between the two.

    In any event, I suppose the Kodak edge markings don't tell us much at all, pity. It would have been nice to date the photo that way. This is not really that important, it's a tiny element in quite a big project that needs to view archive material that is probably not extant.

    The Leam Courier will certainly have records about AP in their archives, there's also stuff at the Country Records Office and the National Archive. Hopefully stuff still exists in the remnants of the firm too. The Bolton, Speke and Banbury divisions mean material probably exists in those respective county archives too. AP has a '25 Club' for employees who had more than 25 years service and they've got some fascinating material such as cine footage of the factories during wartime painted in camouflage with netting over the internal road ways. Lots of work to access all this stuff. In wealthier times I may have been able to get a research grant, for now, I'm doing it slowly in my own time.
    Steve.

  5. #15
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I wish I knew enough about British registration plates to say if that is authentic or not - I'd find it a bit odd to be only 4 digits in the 1930s. But that absolutely is a 1936 Packard. I believe it is a One-Twenty based on the apparently short wheelbase and relatively small rear passenger compartment , but it could be a One-Sixty. The grille is the dead giveaway, as should the hub caps and trunk rack medallion be, if you were to examine them more closely. And it was produced for the UK market - it has right-hand drive.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by perkeleellinen View Post
    In any event, I suppose the Kodak edge markings don't tell us much at all, pity. It would have been nice to date the photo that way.
    I was unable to see any useful edge marks from the scan of your contact sheet. What do you see for edge marks?

  7. #17

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    Ahem... carry on!
    Last edited by wblynch; 06-01-2012 at 08:17 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    - Bill Lynch

  8. #18

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    Because Kodak changed edge markings occasionally (at least for the B&W roll films made Rochester for U.S. use), it is possible to roughly date negatives. So far as I can tell from my collection of negatives, Kodak revised the "Kodak Safety Film" lettering around 1960 by placing the "Kodak" within an arrow as shown on your contact sheet. In 1967, Kodak again revised the marking by putting "Kodak Safety" in regular lettering and "Film" in an arrow. Therefore, I am fairly confident that your contact sheet was printed from film manufactured between 1960 and 1966.

    Gary

  9. #19

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    There is also a good possibility the UK made films would have slightly different edge markings than products cut and packaged in the US.
    Bob

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Railfan View Post
    Because Kodak changed edge markings occasionally (at least for the B&W roll films made Rochester for U.S. use), it is possible to roughly date negatives. So far as I can tell from my collection of negatives, Kodak revised the "Kodak Safety Film" lettering around 1960 by placing the "Kodak" within an arrow as shown on your contact sheet. In 1967, Kodak again revised the marking by putting "Kodak Safety" in regular lettering and "Film" in an arrow. Therefore, I am fairly confident that your contact sheet was printed from film manufactured between 1960 and 1966.

    Gary
    Many thanks for this, Gary. This is the sort of thing that I hoped might be possible. Notwithstanding what Bob says about UK manufactured film, I do think we can date the photos to the early '70s.
    Steve.

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