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  1. #11
    Brian C. Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by erikg View Post
    One thing I do know, don't leave a Diana on the car seat in summer. It never was the same after that.
    How badly did the pictures improve? Did they become sharp and contrasty?

    I have used B&W film that sat in my Jeep all summer, and there were no adverse effects. I'd be concerned about color, but not B&W.

  2. #12

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    Since we are discussing a Diana camera getting worse, to paraphrase Dorothy Parker's famous comment, "How could you tell?"
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by tron_ View Post
    By hot I mean 90F+ and humid. Inside the car I wouldn't be surprised if it got to 110F-120F.
    It's probably not great on the film, but go with the recommendations everyone else has given.

    Get a windshield visor (preferably one from the 80's, purchased with cereal box proofs-of-purchase, and featuring Garfield or a giant pair of sunglasses), face towards the sun and crack the windows ever so slightly. Should significantly cool things down.

    I'd have to think that 110°+ for more than 12 hours could do something, plus humidity, but IDK...
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  4. #14

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    I leave a small kit (35mm body, zoom, a couple rolls of slide film) in my trunk all the time so I can carry it when I'm running or riding my bike after work. I find the trunk stays considerably cooler than the passenger compartment (the car is silver, FWIW). I've never seen a color shift in my slides even when the same roll(s) stays in the car for a couple weeks in the summer with outside temps in the mid to high 80s.

    On more serious photo trips in hotter environments I try to keep the cameras and film in an air-conditioned room when I'm not using them, and in the trunk when I'm out shooting. If you do that, or keep film and cameras in a cooler, be wary of condensation when you go from A/C to the heat and humidity. Letting the camera bag warm up for 15 minutes or so before opening it works for me.

    If your car doesn't have a trunk, you can bury the film in towels, clothes, or whatever, keeping it out of direct sun as much as possible. I've had film canisters heat up to the point that they were warm to the touch and I got a little panicky, but in the end I've never had problems.

  5. #15

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    I know Kodak consumer and professional films had different keeping properties. Kodak recognized that consumer film might be in a camera for a couple of years and go through a variety of temperature extremes. Much of the photographic changes to film happen early in its life; thus consumer films were 'aged' at Kodak prior to release to minimize user keeping effects. Professional films were not so 'aged' and were released with the expectation that dealers and photographers would keep the pro films refrigerated. PE may want to contribute further keeping information.

    Anyway, the effect of leaving film in a hot car is probably worse on pro films than on consumer films.

  6. #16

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    Get a well insulated cooler that your camera bag fits in and keep it in the trunk. You can even add a small ice pack from the dollar store to help it stay cooler.
    Bob

  7. #17
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    That is a fact!

    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Never mind the film, you're trashing your camera equipment.

  8. #18

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    I'm in the school that says the camera is more likely to suffer degradation than the film.

    I can't imagine any problems with film over a couple week period, but I'd want to protect the camera from long-term degradation. So I concur with the suggestions to use an insulated cooler, perhaps covered with blankets or towels, etc. (The cooler would keep out moisture.)

    Regarding film degradation, I was once involved in a test to evaluate just this sort of thing. A pro color neg film was heat stressed vs a couple possible alternative portrait films, including at least one amateur film as a control. We were under the same assumptions as stated by Prof_Pixel.

    To our surprise, the pro film, Kodak VPS III (as I recall), easily outdid the other films. None of them would have had any problem with a couple of weeks in a hot car. Of course, current films may be different, so...

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Since we are discussing a Diana camera getting worse, to paraphrase Dorothy Parker's famous comment, "How could you tell?"
    Ha! The pictures were just as crappy as ever, but the camera, she melted.

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