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  1. #11

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    The Axomat 4 has a tray for filters so I guess I can put filters in it and use it as a color enlarger.
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  2. #12
    polyglot's Avatar
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    I'm pretty sure you will find it harder to get a set of colour-printing filters than a colour enlarger. And you will probably pay more for them than a colour enlarger. And while they might work, they don't give you adjustments as fine as the knobs on colour enlarger (2 points matters!), and they're way more hassle than turning a knob.

    The final insult is that gel filters (that go in the drawer) will fade over time and with use because they are merely dyes in a resin. In comparison, dichroic filters in a colour enlarger will never fade because they use metallic coatings on glass to achieve the filtering effect. A dichroic filter's effect is based on destructive interference of internal reflections in the coating layer - just like an anti-reflective coating, but of a thickness chosen to give strong attenuation of transmitted light at particular wavelengths.

    Buy a real colour enlarger and don't make life unnecessarily difficult for yourself. It won't cost any more and it will save you grief and time.
    Last edited by polyglot; 06-29-2012 at 09:09 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13

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    Ok, I've bought a Super Chromega D color enlarger. I tried compensating the films orange mask with a bit of cyan (so the projected image was had white highlights - shadows actually since it's a negative) but the print is still orange. I'm starting to think it's something with the paper/developer or the method I used for developing, 45s in developer 45s in bleachfix, temperature doesn't seem to affect the print I get the same result with preheated chemicals and room temperature.

  4. #14
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    Instead of using cyan, try using 65 magenta and 55 yellow as a starting point. It won't be perfect, but it should be close and you can deviate from there.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

  5. #15

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    It may be counter-intuitive, but when printing color negatives, you need to add the SAME color as the color is off. i.e. if the print is Red, add Red filtration.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by hencz View Post
    Ok, I've bought a Super Chromega D color enlarger. I tried compensating the films orange mask with a bit of cyan (so the projected image was had white highlights - shadows actually since it's a negative) but the print is still orange. I'm starting to think it's something with the paper/developer or the method I used for developing, 45s in developer 45s in bleachfix, temperature doesn't seem to affect the print I get the same result with preheated chemicals and room temperature.
    Ignore the mask - the paper is designed with it in mind (or more accurately, the mask is designed with the paper in mind).

    Your paper will most likely have a suggested starting filtration - that is where you should start.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #17

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    This is copied from another thread, I printed this out when I started printing in colour. Might be of help:


    If your cast is red: You need to add cyan to the print. Therefore, you need to subtract cyan from the filter pack.
    Since you are using the two warm filters only, put "subtract cyan" into "warm" terms: "add red".
    Equal amounts of magenta and yellow equal red. Thus, when you have a red cast,
    add equal amounts magenta and yellow filtration to the filter pack.

    If your cast is magenta: You need to add green to the print.
    Therefore you need to subtract green from the filter pack.
    This is the same thing as adding the compliment of green to your filter pack.
    Thus, when you have a magenta cast, add magenta filtration.

    If your cast is yellow: You need to add blue to the print. Therefore you need to subtract blue from the filter pack.
    This is the same thing as adding the compliment of blue to your filter pack.
    Thus, when you have a yellow cast, add yellow filtration.

    If your cast is green: You need to add magenta to the print. Therefore you need to subtract magenta from the filter pack.
    Thus, when you have a green cast, subtract magenta filtration.

    If your cast is blue: You need to add yellow to the print. Therefore you need to subtract yellow from the filter pack.
    Thus, when you have a blue cast, subtract yellow filtration.

    If your cast is cyan: You need to add red to the print. Therefore, you need to subtract red from the filter pack.
    Equal amounts of red and yellow equal red. Subtract equal amounts magenta and yellow filtration to subtract red to the filter pack,
    and thus add red to the print.

    You should be able to at least on basic trend in all of this that you can use as a shortcut: If the print has a warm cast, you must add filtration.
    If the print has a cool cast, you must subtract filtration.
    Thus, when using just magenta and yellow filters (both of which are warm filters),
    you always add filtration to cool a print and subtract filtration to warm it.
    Steve.

  8. #18

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    ok, I'm almost there with the colors, but now, with the filters turned up the image is much less contrasty. It's very dim.

  9. #19
    polyglot's Avatar
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    Changing filter settings means you need to change the exposure also. When I (totally not an expert at RA4) do this, I:
    * get the exposure right within about half a stop
    * adjust the filter pack to get colour exact
    * adjust the exposure again to get the highlight/shadow detail I want

    Because the filters work by attenuation, changing them will change the density as well as the colour, so you can't avoid that final step of tweaking exposure.

  10. #20
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    You are getting through the hard part.

    Once you get a good print you will have a baseline, a workable starting point for that paper; life is easier after that.

    With that baseline you can then use meters like Ilford's EM10 to find exposure or like a Beseler PM2L (or similar) to find both exposure and color pack.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

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