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  1. #1

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    Fujicolor CrystalArchive paper - Orange Mask

    Hi,

    I'm using Fujicolor CrystalArchive paper with Rollei Digibase RA-4 Monokit developer. I use an old russian enlarger at f/16 that has no filters (apparently it's been used for b&w). All of my prints have an orange mask on them, completely monochrome. I tried exposing it longer/shorter, keeping it in the developer longer, still they have some kind of orange fade (only darker or lighter).
    Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    It is always a moment when I see the print after developing when I forget to drop the filters back in place on my enlarger.

    Color paper requires filtration.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #3
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    BTW welcome to APUG.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #4

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    Thanks, is there a way to attach filters to my enlarger? I have 30mm thread lenses.

  5. #5
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Yes the red filter is for B&W so that the paper doesn't expose until its out of the way. I don't trust that process.

    I have an old enlarger for my 4x5 stuff and just hold the filters/gels in the light path.

    The bigger challenge is finding the right stack of filters/gels to use to get the right correction.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #6
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    If you want to print colour, you need a colour enlarger. It has cyan, magenta and yellow filters that slide in and out of the light path between bulb and diffusion box when you turn knobs on the head, thereby changing the colour. You need the ability to nearly-infinitely vary the filter colour in order to get the colour balance of the print correct.

    Colour enlargers are as common as B&W enlargers in my experience and you can generally pick one up (in a Western country like US/EU/AU) for $0-$150 depending on size, condition and which lens might be included. You can probably find someone throwing one out if you look in local classifieds.

  7. #7
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    There ARE color filter kits that can be used with a B&W enlarger (these are different from "viewing" filters), but many people find it's PITA to use them. They will contain a set of C, M and Y filters with different densities and you create a "pack" of them. For example, if you need 45M 50Y, which is a typical starting filtration, you use 40M+5M+40Y+10Y pack. This is just an example.

    Probably easier to find a used color enlarger. In color printing, you need to adjust the filtration and it's easiest done by just turning a knob...

  8. #8

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    I'm thinking of buying either a Krokus 44 MAT Color or a Meopta Axomat 4 both under €15. Neither of them seem to have knobs for filter adjustment.. Anyone has any experience with either of them?
    Last edited by hencz; 06-28-2012 at 10:34 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #9
    RPC
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    Another alternative using the enlarger you have is tri-color printing. With this you make successive exposures through a red, green and blue filter under the lens to accomplish color balancing. This way you do not print through a stack of filters and quality is better. You simply change the exposure time through each filter. Wratten #99, 98 and 29 will work well. One must avoid vibration of the enlarger head when changing filters to maintain sharpness, however. But a colorhead is highly recommended

  10. #10
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    An "Axomat 4" is not a colour enlarger, but an "Axomat 4 Colour" looks like it has a different (more horizontal than vertical) head on it. A google image search shows they seem to have wheels on the front; make sure those are present when you buy, and preferably test the enlarger by turning it on and watching the colour change when you adjust the wheels.

    I would also suggest you buy an enlarger that can do medium format, preferably 6x7. They're just as common and cheap, often more sturdy (prints are not softened as easily by slight vibrations in your house), and you can step up to a larger format without replacing the enlarger.

    Clean the colour filters gently with lint-free wet-wipes when you get it; they get quite dusty which can cause problems. They're very thin glass though; do not break them or scrub the dichroic coatings off!

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