Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,000   Posts: 1,524,361   Online: 808
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26
  1. #11
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    Seems you have a water mark on the yellow flowers (besides some dust). There is something wrong either in the last bath or in your drying method. If you explain your drying method maybe we can offer some suggestions.

    In any case if the water mark is on the support side it can be easily cleaned with no risks.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  2. #12

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    339
    Images
    11
    Yes, I simply hung it up to dry. I got some of the photo-flo my B/W prints but I wasn't sure if it's OK for color...I would think it would be OK and I should put it in the final rinse for *any* film (correct me if I'm wrong) I have a squeegee but I know some people don't recommend it. I did try to use a lint free cloth to remove the dust before scanning. How's the best way to clean the water marks?

  3. #13
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    Your C-41 final rinse should contain some product equivalent to photo-flo. Strictly speaking the final rinse is not C-41 so do check your workflow contains a proper final rinse. I think adding some photo-flo to your final rinse shouldn't give any damage.

    Maybe your water is very hard. Maybe your final rinse is too diluted.

    Personally I don't use a squeegee. I just extract the film from the tank, put it while in the reels inside the final rinse (this is considered wrong by some people, on the assumption that the final rinse contains some substance which stick to the plastic reels, my idea is that whatever substance can be removed and in any case I don't observe any deposit), extract it from the final rinse, open the reels, carefully get the film in my hands avoiding it to touch anything and avoiding to touch the images with my finger, and hang the film inside my drying cabinet using a weight to keep it properly extended.

    Some people keep the film oblique so that the water slides more easily along one edge of the film and makes a drop on one of the bottom corner. It's done especially with plane film probably, which is easy to hang by one corner. I don't have enough room in my drying cabinet to keep the roll film oblique but observe no problems in the final result.

    Before scanning I use air (a blower brush, take the brush away and only use the blower) and blow air on both sides. Works a lot. I also scan with ICE at minimum level (reduction of dust artifacts with automatic reconstruction of nearby zones). I observe no dust whatsoever on my scans.

    The back of the film can be cleaned with most everything, even denaturated alcohol on some cotton, the emulsion side is trickier, in those rare occurrences when I had to clean it I use a product called PEC-12 with some specific little towels, PEC-PADS. It works especially well with finger marks, I have no idea if it is effective with water marks.

    Personally I would try to dissolve water marks by re-immersing the film into final rinse and hanging it up again, hopefully the water will dissolve the water mark on the film. That would also take obstinate dust particles away hopefully.

    If you have a shower with cabinet, or a small shower room, a good way to dry your film away from dust is to let hot water run until the room is full of vapour, then wait for the vapour to sit (it will bring down all dust particle in the air), hang your film, close the cabinet, exit the bathroom, close the door, don't enter in the bathroom until the film is dry. Remaining the bathroom stirs air which stirs dust which sticks on your film.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  4. #14

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    339
    Images
    11
    Thank you for the tips....I'll have to take them and rinse them with the photoflo added to the rinse water and re-hang. The bathroom I use doesn't have a shower (that's why there is room for a darkroom) but perhaps I can bring it upstairs into one of the other bathrooms with a shower.

  5. #15
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,105
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by cepwin View Post
    Thank you for the tips....I'll have to take them and rinse them with the photoflo added to the rinse water and re-hang. The bathroom I use doesn't have a shower (that's why there is room for a darkroom) but perhaps I can bring it upstairs into one of the other bathrooms with a shower.
    You need to use something other than photoflo plus rinse water for the final treatment of colour film.

    You need to use "Final Rinse" or something similar - otherwise your film will be susceptible to bacteria.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #16

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    339
    Images
    11
    Interesting, I looked "Final Rinse" up and it's a stabilizer. The kit I used had a stabilizer that I put it though after the blix and a rinse, so wouldn't that be the equivalent?

  7. #17
    hrst's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Finland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,300
    Images
    1
    Do some forum search. In a nutshell:

    C-41 films need a specific processing step as a LAST step, with no washing afterwards.

    This step was called "Stabilizer" and it contained a low amount of formaldehyde.

    Due to environmental concerns, the C-41 films were updated so that they did not need this stabilizer anymore, but a new product called "Final rinse" was introduced.

    All C-41 films need either Final Rinse or a Stabilizer. You CAN use the old "stabilizer" for both old and new films, but the new Final Rinse can only be used with new films. However, as of today, all film that is still in good condition, is new film compatible with final rinse.

    Both "Stabilizer" and "Final rinse" already contain Photo Flo or equivalent. Adding more will not hurt the stabilizing action, but probably won't help either. If you have drying marks, try to mix stabilizer/final rinse in distilled water and be careful about the drying conditions.

    Old-style stabilizer is also easy to DIY; just prepare a photo flo / whatever wetting agent you use solution as you normally do for BW, then add 37% formaldehyde at about 5-10 ml per liter.

  8. #18
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    To resume last bath requirements for E-6 and C-41:

    E-6 (typical colour slide treatment) need formalin either in the last bath (in which case in Kodak/Fuji parlance it is called "stabilizer") or during the pre-bleach stage. If the pre-bleach stage contains formaline, the last bath doesn't need any. In this case the last bath in Kodak/Fuji parlance is called "final rinse".

    In Kodak/Fuji parlance, "stabilizer" has a precise meaning, which can be simplified as: last bath containing formaline; "final rinse" has a precise meaning, which is "last bath without formaline so if you use it in an E-6 process you have to make sure there is formaline in your E-6 pre-bleach stage".

    C-41 (colour negative treatment) can use "final rinse", i.e. doesn't need formaline. But you can always use an E-6 "stabilizer" instead on a colour negative film. You cannot use simple water + PhotoFlo because a colour film doesn't contain any silver in it, which acts as an antimicrobial, so you need to put some antimicrobial on your colour film, be it with or without formaline, be it "stabilizer" or "final rinse", you have to use something of the kind.

    So:

    Stabilizer: works always for E-6 and C-41, you cannot go wrong with it.
    Final rinse: works always for C-41; works well with E-6 only if your pre-bleach stage contains formaline. Otherwise, no good. If your E-6 pre-bleach doesn't contain formaline you must use a last bath containing formaline (i.e. a "stabilizer").
    Water + PhotoFlo: works only for black & White. You need some preservative for colour film.

    Final rinse or stabilizer, as said, are always "final". You don't rinse the film with water after that.

    Other producers than Kodak or Fuji, IIRC, don't necessarily use this terminology so you have to check yourself, when working with E-6, if you have formaline somewhere in your process.

    Probably a lot of repetition in this, but as we would say in another thread, repetita iuvant.
    Last edited by Diapositivo; 07-01-2012 at 06:14 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  9. #19
    mts
    mts is offline
    mts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    334
    Images
    106
    I scratch-mix my chemistry.
    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    71
    Wow! This is the first time I heard that you can do C-41 at 75 degrees. This will make life so much easier. Just curious. How did you figure out this magic formula?

    Quote Originally Posted by mfratt View Post
    I usually develop for 8 minutes at 75 degrees. Much easier to keep consistent than 102 degrees.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin