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  1. #1

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    Did my first roll for C41...

    After reading the thread on film development and watching Mr. Harmon's excellent video demonstrating the process I decided to order the C41 kit that was used in the video. After in essence circling around it nervously I made up the kit and ran the roll I just finished though it. Right now they're drying and I definitely has images A few hiccups. First I couldn't find the scissors when I was loading the film in the dark....had to put the film in a dry tank, close it up so I could turn the lights on and find it. It took me forever to get the film on the reel. Then when pouring the blix I managed to drip it all over the place. Other than making a bit of a mess I think it went pretty well. The 1 liter Unicolor kit is < $20 and was simpler than I thought it would be.

  2. #2

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    I've done all my own C-41 from 35 to 4x5. A few hiccups along the way, but overall consistent results. Much better than paying $3/sheet for someone else to screw up my film, at least.

    I usually develop for 8 minutes at 75 degrees. Much easier to keep consistent than 102 degrees.
    ~ Michelle

  3. #3

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    Even with years of experience if you do not make a mental note where you placed all your items before shutting off the lights you will be farting around in the dark longer. I usually have only a couple of rolls to load therefore I found a change bag or darkroom bag is quicker works the best, I do not have to worry about the film being accidentally fogged.

  4. #4

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    Yeah, I knew where where everything was except the scissors :-) Interesting about going at 75 for eight minutes....if you're getting the results you want then it seems eaiser

  5. #5

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    Here are two of the images from the roll...I have a few more in the gallery

  6. #6

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    They look great. I only shoot b&w because I can develop at home. I've been pretty hesitant to develop colour and hate paying a lab to do it for me. What you using for a scanner?

  7. #7

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    Thank you!! I'm using an Epson V600. I went with the 600 because I didn't think I could justify the 2x + cost of the 700. I wouldn't be afraid of color. The main thing that's different is the need for temperature control. I ordered the unicolor kit from freestyle. This is the same kit that APUG member Josh Harmon did an excellent video demonstrating it's use. It's a 1 liter kit which is just the right size for home development. The developer I got for B/W prints makes 5 liters and I had to order containers for it. The Unicolor kit is less than $20 US and does about 8 rolls...much cheaper than sending it out. I'm not sure if it's available where your are or what the equivalent kit would be if it's not.

  8. #8
    mikecnichols's Avatar
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    Funny about the scissors. I once loaded everything in my bag and then put my arms in ready to reel and then realized that all the tools and film were in between the two layers of bag. Oops.

    My only real problem I've had with the developing process is with 120 film. Sometimes, it really doesn't want to go onto the reel. Last time I did a batch of rolls, I worked on one roll for two hours. In that time, the bag started condensing and making the film become sweaty and sticky. I ended up having to go down to my darkroom and get it on out of the bag. Of course, there are hiccups on the roll, but the images really came out nice.

  9. #9
    mts
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    I strongly encourage separate bleach and fix, because you can 1) visually inspect that they are working as expected, and 2) they are much longer lived than when combined into blix.

    A sulfite containing stop bath following the developer is also beneficial because it eliminates carry-over into the bleach and permits subsequent processing in room light. I follow the stop (1 or 2 mins) with a couple of rinses 90 -100 F, and then open the processing can to proceed to bleach/fix/and wash in room light. If you use a separate bleach and fix, then follow the bleach with another rinse to reduce the carry-over of the bleach into the fix.

    In this way of processing, the bleach and fix last far longer than does the developer and the cost is reduced even further.
    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

  10. #10

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    Thank you Mike! Yes, I was pleased with the results.
    mts....I'm curious then, what products do you use? I did hear there are color kits that do separate out the two. I can see the advantages of separating the bleach and fix rather than combining them.

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