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  1. #1
    Morgan ~ MOD54's Avatar
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    Processing C41 is Easy. Yes it is.

    So i'm throwing this out there, processing C41 at home is easy.

    What do you think?

    Here is a new short film showing my workflow from shooting to printing, well digital printing.



    In the next few weeks i'm going to make a more detailed short on the actual process of developing your own C-41.

    It would be interesting to have peoples thoughts about processing their own colour film.

    Any thoughts, musings or mumblings you have let me know. I can then construct a video that will actually help.

    Cheers,

    Morgan ~ MOD54.

  2. #2

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    From experience, I had perfect results with E-6 process, 7 Step
    every film & frame from the first run with the Phototherm Processor.
    It took me 3 - 35mm films cut down as test shots & 6 runs of C-41 of testing.
    Streaks, Water Marks, Magenta Tint, you name it, it had to be dealt with.
    Finally now, I am receiving some excellent results.
    I thought C-41 would be easier than E6, not in my case.
    The last time I processed C-41 it was called C-22, the Film was Kodak Vericolor.
    Fuji didn't even exist as yet.
    One more test run for the assurance of consistency in the results, should do it.

  3. #3
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Yes, I agree, C41 is pretty easy.

    RA 4 too.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #4

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    I also agree...did my first roll last Friday and aside from an issue with drying it was no problem.. The main difference is temperature control...that's a challenge that is a non-issue with B/W since B/W can be processed at room temp.

  5. #5
    Morgan ~ MOD54's Avatar
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    Thats what i think, but so many people still think colour is difficult to do. The temperature control is a little more difficult, but at least you don't have to think too much about dev times, and you can process different films at the same time.

    I'm on a mission this month to promote colour, and doing a little workshop at Silverprint in London on the 26th.

    Cheers,

    morgan.

  6. #6
    polyglot's Avatar
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    Absolutely C41 is easy to do. The only hard or expensive part is obtaining the good (not blix) chemistry in sane (not lab) quantities unless you're in the EU where Fuji Hunt is readily available.

  7. #7
    Jeff L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Absolutely C41 is easy to do. The only hard or expensive part is obtaining the good (not blix) chemistry in sane (not lab) quantities unless you're in the EU where Fuji Hunt is readily available.
    Same issue in Canada. The chemical kits (not blix) are available in the US but shipping expensive. I use the Unicolour/Jobo (blix) kit from B&H because shipping is easy and cheap.

  8. #8

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    Very timely video as I am just starting out trying to process at home. Just seeing your big tub that you use to keep the temperature of the chemicals at the proper temp helped out alot as I was wondering the best way to keep everything warm, now I know. I will be doing my work exactly as you do simply because I don't have a darkroom but have invested in scanners. And have a nice Kodak dye sub printer that I love for printing since a real darkroom is impossible right now.

    I would love to see your recommendations/techniques you use to mix the chemicals, store them, ect. Perhaps discussion of why you went one way versus another way of mixing/storing/using chemicals. Looks like you are using the Patterson System 4 tanks (which I have). Really would love to see how you pre heat your tanks and/or film, how you keep blix from getting contaminated, how you rinse negatives and expecially how you dry your negatives to keep water spots off of them. That said, I don't use sheet film (yet), but am strictly 35mm and 120 user.

    I look forward to your videos.

    Bob E.
    Nikon F5, Nikon F4S, Nikon FA, Nikon FE, Nikon N90, Nikon N80, Nikon N75, Mamiya 645 Pro, Mamiya Press Super 23, Yashica Lynx 14e, Yashica Electro GSN, Yashica 124G, Yashica D

  9. #9
    Morgan ~ MOD54's Avatar
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    Hi Bob,

    I'm working on the above at the moment, so I'll keep you posted. One note on the water bath. Best to keep it as big as possible, helps control the temperature.

    Cheers,

    Morgan.

  10. #10
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    While I am not ready to process color at the moment, I do want to learn how to do it. I had always assumed that it would be to difficult for me to master. Hopefully, this is not the case and I will be able to process color at home. My local Sam's Club just stopped offering this service, and I can not find another lab that offers processing as reasonable as Sam's did. Thank-you for the information.

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