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  1. #1
    VoidoidRamone's Avatar
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    Color printing stuff, need help...

    I am going to start working in color next semester. And there are two pieces of equipment that I have questions about. First is the Durst RCP 40 and the second is the Beseler PM2L Color Analyzer. Since I am a total newbie to anything color I'm not really sure how to use either of these. If anyone has some info on either or perhaps a link to a manual I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks.
    -Grant

  2. #2

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    My understanding is with colour processors you stick exposed paper in one end and processed paper comes out the other. If you're just using the thing then that's about it. If it doesn't handle wash/dry then you'll have to do that. OTOH if it does wash/dry you'll get a processed,washed and dried print. I wish I had enough pennies for one of those-) Somebody will have to fill it with chemicals. Clean it. But I'm guessing you'll just be using the thing.

    Do you each get an analyzer? Or will they be programmed by somebody before hand?

    http://www.puresilver.org/

    Click on the equipment heading. The manuals are for different models then yours but close.

  3. #3
    Eric Rose's Avatar
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    Don't waste your time on playing with an analyzer. Learn to color print the proper way by looking at the print and adjusting the filter pack to get the right balance. In no time at all you will be able to bang out spot on prints. Analyzers suffer from "subject failure" and will drive you nuts. I don't know one professional printer that uses an analyzer. They are good however for determining initial exposure.

    The processor is just a box with gears and rollers that takes your exposed paper in at one end, drags it thru a bunch of nasty chemicals and then drops it out the other end all developed and hopefully dried.
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  4. #4
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EricR
    Learn to color print the proper way by looking at the print and adjusting the filter pack to get the right balance.
    Color Analyzers are like meters, they try to make everything fit into their idea of what proper color balance is. I agree, it is best to learn to print color the old fashioned way. That way if you decide to use a color analyzer in the future you will understand the principles behind them and you will know when to override its recommendations.
    Robert M. Teague
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    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  5. #5
    VoidoidRamone's Avatar
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    Alright, thanks for the suggestions... I will most likely not use the analyzer, since it already looks confusing enough. And another question, would it just be easier to use a drum instead of the processer? I had heard that drums take less chemistry, is this true? Thanks. -Grant

  6. #6
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VoidoidRamone
    And another question, would it just be easier to use a drum instead of the processer? I had heard that drums take less chemistry, is this true? Thanks. -Grant
    I'll have to admit I have never used anything but a Jobo rotary processor (drum), and mostly Cibachrome at that.
    Robert M. Teague
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    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  7. #7

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    I just made about 50 8x10s this week using drums. I wish I had a processor. I don't mind drums for my normal sedate pace but I needed these thing done. Drums will use less chemicals but if this is at school won't they be filling the thing up with chemicals? The processor needs more chemicals to fill but if it's being used enough it won't waste any chemicals.


    If you have a chance to try both then see which one you like better.

  8. #8
    DKT
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    there were a couple of models of the RCP40. the early ones would have a fixed speed, meaning they ran EP2 and unless it's been modified it won't be much use now. The later models, had variable speeds and temps, so you could run a few different processes. I don't think any of them have been made in the past ten years or so. The models that replaced them were the ACP processors--both the RCP and the ACP were made by Thermophot for Durst, so you might be able to get some help from them. I have an RCP 20, and have only minor experience with the RCP40. They can be good or bad--depending on the age and condition--but the parts aren't available for them anymore and there's no tech support.

    as for RA4 in a processor, you will use several liters or more of chemistry and it won't be one-shot. You'll have to monitor it somehow--control strips are the way labs do it--and you'll have to replenish the solutions to keep the activity up, keep the pH in check, and possibly check the specific gravity. The dev will be carried directly over in the blix--which will cause some problems if you don't repl. properly. Some of the older EP2 type machines that had 3 tanks can be good for RA4 because you can use a stop. The basic RCP40 would have been for processing only, with the wash and dryer as an add-on unit. If you don't have the whole thing, then you'll need to wash outside the machine and use some sort of dryer as well. When you color print, the prints need to be dry before you do any corrections.

    If you print everyday though, the processor makes sense and you can make it work. But if you just sporadically print--you'll waste money on the chemistry, you won't have enough throughput to keep the replenishment working right, and you'll have to use higher rates of replenisher as well. You'll also spend a little bit of time doing chemical mixing and maintenance. If you have to drain the machine frequently--it will get old fast. You can probably get a couple of weeks out properly maintained chemistry in a small machine though....when you dump it & start over, you'll need to pull the racks out and clean them etc. This will take maybe a half hour or so. So--it saves time, but you also need to use it to make it work.



 

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