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  1. #1
    ektachrome's Avatar
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    How old is this film?

    Hi guys
    Just got an old 100ft roll of Ektachrome.
    It does not have an expiry date.
    Does anyone know when this film is from?
    Also, what ISO should I shoot at?
    The picture is attached
    Thanks
    Ektachrome
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails New Picture (4).jpg  
    Kodachrome, Plus X, 669, 600, Ektachrome, BW400CN, FP3000B.
    Every time I find a film I like, they discontinue it!

    Long live film!

  2. #2
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    I would load a short load of maybe 20 exposures and test by using different ISO settings on the camera.
    Either set up a scene, or choose one to photograph. make 2 or 3 exposures at EI 25, then 2 or 3 at 50, then 20 or 3 at 100, then finally at 200.
    After processing youwil be able to easily decide which is better for this roll of film. As for the expiration date, I can't help you.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  3. #3
    kerne's Avatar
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    Ektachrome Professional 200 EPD (5036). Judging by the label, possibly from the early 80's. Will be interesting to see how much color shift there is since I see there's another one for sale up on the 'bay and the seller doesn't say how it was stored.

  4. #4

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    Since it is a higher (200) ISO (ASA) Film & outdated by easily 25 years, the Film lost a considerable amount of speed.
    I would start at 100 ISO & work down to as low as 3 ISO ( as B&W Infrared Film), expect a heavy color shift also.
    Doesn't hurt to experiment, although I wouldn't photograph a important assignment with it.

  5. #5
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ektachrome View Post
    Hi guys
    Just got an old 100ft roll of Ektachrome.
    It does not have an expiry date.
    Does anyone know when this film is from?
    Also, what ISO should I shoot at?
    The picture is attached
    Thanks
    Ektachrome
    It's marked E4 this was phased out in 1976, when the less toxic E6 process took over, that means your film is at least 36 years old, although it could be considerably older. The label style would be common to that age of film. The E4 process is no longer available, if you want to use the film, your probably best to try a B&W negative process, although if it's a faster film it could be fogged to the point of no longer being usable.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  6. #6
    kerne's Avatar
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    It's E-6.

  7. #7
    ektachrome's Avatar
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    It is definitely E6.
    Thanks for the ideas.
    When my SLR is fixed, I will experiment.
    Can anyone suggest a starter ISO?
    Thanks
    Ektachrome
    Kodachrome, Plus X, 669, 600, Ektachrome, BW400CN, FP3000B.
    Every time I find a film I like, they discontinue it!

    Long live film!

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by ektachrome View Post
    It is definitely E6.
    Thanks for the ideas.
    When my SLR is fixed, I will experiment.
    Can anyone suggest a starter ISO?
    Thanks
    Ektachrome
    As Bronica645 has said above, just experiment over a wide range....it's easy, just expose a test film of a single subject, say a sunlit building, in 1/3 stop increases starting at 200 ISO, working right down to 8 ISO or less. A 24 exp length will be more than enough for this, and the result will give you an accurate guide for further tests, and also confirm the general condition of the film as regards color casts or fogging given the ago.
    (All Ektachrome 200 is/was E-6. The old "High Speed Ektachrome" (Daylight version 160 ASA, or Type B 125 ASA) was E-4.)

  9. #9
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kerne View Post


    It's E-6.
    I stand corrected, looked like a 4 to me though on the original pic.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  10. #10

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    I played with a lot of different outdated film stocks. I would suggest starting at 12 ASA and doing bracketed exposures up to say ASA 100. Keep notes. I'll betcha it comes in at 25-50 ASA or thereabouts.

    If the colors are awful, try using it as b&w negative film.

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