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  1. #1
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    Is color print film shot at box speed?

    I do not shoot much color print film. Many of the B&W films that I normally use work better for me when shot a half the box speed.
    Is this normally true with color print film too. I am shooting some Porta 400 and wonder if most people shot it at 400 or something less?
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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  2. #2

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    Colour neg film can take a certain amount of over exposure without ill effects. I generally allow about 1/3 stop extra exposure. Try rating it at 320. Under exposed colour neg film can look pretty bad but a little bit of over exposure just seems to pump up the colour. Try bracketing your first roll and see what works.

  3. #3
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Box speed works well for me.

    A bit extra won't hurt but doesn't necessarily help.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #4
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    You will find a lot of threads in APUG on this subject.

    The not-so-general consensus is that best results are obtained at box speed but overexposure gives a safety buffer, because negative film has much more exposure latitude toward overexposure than underexposure, so by opening a bit (from 0.3 EV to 1 EV) you will capture more shadows without compromising your highlights.

    Somebody will tell you that systematic overexposure of 1 EV will alter the chromatic response of the film. Other will tell you that they don't notice the difference. YMMV.
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  5. #5
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    I always work on the principal that the film manufacturers know better than I what the speed of their films are, and unless I consistently get under or overexposed results I stick to the boxed speed.
    Ben

  6. #6

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    Kodak is always over-rated, especially Portra, I shoot box speed on new stuff but anything expired over 200 ISO I drop it a 1/3 to 1/2 stop

    Portra, especially the VC and NC variants, not new Portra, looks great at 320 and is more inclined for prints where as new Portra is made for scans.

    All others I do at box speed as long as it is within expiry.......about to do some Techpan at ISO 16, need to find a good tripod lol
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  7. #7

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    I like shooting my Portra 400 @200.

    To be the skin looks really good, but that's just me. You can see examples of Portra 400 (35mm) shot at 200 in my gallery.

  8. #8
    Rudeofus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    I always work on the principal that the film manufacturers know better than I what the speed of their films are, and unless I consistently get under or overexposed results I stick to the boxed speed.
    Be aware that box speed is a selling point, so there is some pressure on manufacturers to be overly optimistic. Supposedly there is a 30% speed difference between developing immediately after exposure vs. waiting a few days. Guess which number the box speed will show ....
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  9. #9
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Actually box speed is a well thought out industry standard (iso) with real basis in the facts and the physics involved.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #10
    Rudeofus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Actually box speed is a well thought out industry standard (iso) with real basis in the facts and the physics involved.
    Box speed may well be based on physical facts, but requires a procedure which is rarely followed in practical work. See my point above.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

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