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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    The stabilizer is a required step, see B&W film doesn't need it, because silver is a natural bactericide, in colour films the silver is fixed out, and bacteria love gelatin, so it needs to be poisoned in some way so that the bacteria don't eat it. C41 films now use a different chemical for this, E6 uses formaldehyde for this.
    OK, I understand that. Its not going to stop me from E-6 processing or using the Tetenal kit. I love slides. But I have a problem with dare devil attitude with the chemicals like formalin or formaldehyde.

    I was just curious to know if there was an alternative. It doesn't look like any. Unless of course one wants to process the slides strictly for scanning and not worrying about their life. But I am a sucker for projecting them and I have to deal with the stabilizer for keeping them in good shape.

  2. #12
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    It's just not that dangerous. Use gloves, ventilate, don't worry so much. That's all it takes to "take it seriously."

  3. #13
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmallick View Post
    But I have a problem with dare devil attitude with the chemicals like formalin or formaldehyde.
    Don't see any such attitudes around here. Just the opposite, actually.

    Most here are strongly in favor of the safe handling and use of chemistry. And not in favor of seemingly hysterical attitudes against the rational use of chemistry. That hurts us all. An undergradute (or even good high school) course in Chemistry 101 should be more than sufficient to teach the lab skills necessary to handle photographic darkroom level chemicals safely, even if one is only a "cookbook" DIY user.

    And if you're not DIY compounding formulas on your own and simply using commercially available prepackged kits, just follow the manufacturer's instructions and use common sense.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  4. #14

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    The msds sheets were written to apply to handing commercial size containers, like a 45 gallon barrel of the stuff, not to qtys you will be handling. Try reading the msds sheets for the ingredients of the gasoline you put in the tank of your vehicle. You probably wouldn't want to go within a hundred yards/meters of a filling station if you took those ones seriously, much less drive around with 15 gallons of it in the car.
    Bob

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob-D659 View Post
    The msds sheets were written to apply to handing commercial size containers, like a 45 gallon barrel of the stuff, not to qtys you will be handling. Try reading the msds sheets for the ingredients of the gasoline you put in the tank of your vehicle. You probably wouldn't want to go within a hundred yards/meters of a filling station if you took those ones seriously, much less drive around with 15 gallons of it in the car.
    reminds me of watching my dad working on the farmall H tractor. He'd take the fuel filter glass bowl off and suck out whatever was in there. That usually resulted in a fair amount of gas (leaded) in his mouth, which he'd spit out rather quickly.


    don't drink your e6
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  6. #16

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    Interestingly enough, all those "old geezers" living well into their 90's now days used to go to the drug store, buy a few of cans of formalin and fumigate their houses with it. I have noticed that common sense has preceded them into their graves. I used to buy it to pickle frogs for dissection later when I was about 12.
    Bob

  7. #17
    GRHazelton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmallick View Post
    You may not, but I value my life and take MSDS sheets seriously.



    Did you do a study on this?

    I have made sure I have enough ventilation in my small darkroom. When I do E-6, I keep the door open. But I still want to treat carcinogenic chemicals with respect. There is a reason why E-6 processing has been relegated to the crazy few.
    Did you not see my suggestion of rubber/vinyl gloves? I was trying, obviously unsuccessfully, to bring a little humor and perspective to this thread. As Roger Cole noted, have you looked under your sink lately? Aerosol oven cleaners. Good lord, they disperse sodium hydroxide into the air! Not good to inhale or get in the eyes.

    BW chemistries also use some unpleasant chemicals. I haven't seen any folk on this forum inveighing against them. Of course it could be that having two years of a college chemistry major, and being raised by a PhD chemical engineer, also a darkroom worker, gave me a more sanguine perspective on chemical risk. Just remember, "natural" ain't always good; Mother Nature has lots of nasty surprises awaiting the unwary!

    Life is inherently dangerous. Doing E-6 at home with proper precautions is doubtless far safer than driving to the market for a 6 pack of beer, which isn't good for one either. BTW, any smokers out there? Talk about risky voluntary behavior! And I make that statement as a "recovering smoker," 18 years and still clear and clean. One day at a time....

  8. #18
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmallick View Post
    OK, I understand that. Its not going to stop me from E-6 processing or using the Tetenal kit. I love slides. But I have a problem with dare devil attitude with the chemicals like formalin or formaldehyde.

    I was just curious to know if there was an alternative. It doesn't look like any. Unless of course one wants to process the slides strictly for scanning and not worrying about their life. But I am a sucker for projecting them and I have to deal with the stabilizer for keeping them in good shape.
    You need a healthy respect for the chemical, and to handle it properly. One thing to remember, the amount of formaldehyde in a given volume of stabilizer is small, according to an MSDS I found it's between 1 and 5%, however that MSDS is very old (1995) and looks like it is to older standards, so it's only 2 pages, it does not indicate whether that is the concentrate or working solution. You can email Tetenal and ask for an updated MSDS for the product you're using.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  9. #19

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    just to clarify
    when I mentioned in the second post that per MSD sheet it contains formaldehyde I meant that in a positive way bc like it was mentioned above for E-6 it is a must per Photo Engineer. From my experience stabilizer in Unicolor C-41 kit was leaving residue (not water marks) after drying and arista E-6 does not include stabilizer. I stopped using stabilizers included in kits and switched to kodak stabilizer III with formaldehyde (hard to find now, but maybe that's me) and no more residue on negatives. It does not smell really. I'm not an expert but by comparing smell only, Blix used in those kits has to be toxic

    I ordered yesterday Tetenal Colortec E-6 from freestyle, we will see how it compares to Arista E-6.

    Tomasz
    Last edited by wiedzmin; 07-13-2012 at 06:54 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: correction

  10. #20
    BrendanCarlson's Avatar
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    Ooohh, I can't wait to try this, I've been using the Arista E6 Kit.
    Everybody has a photographic memory, some just don't have film.
    My Website and Gallery is at www.bcarlsonmedia.com
    My Twitter is @brendancarlson

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