Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,930   Posts: 1,585,399   Online: 1008
      
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 44
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hollis, NH
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    732
    Images
    3
    Yes - just looked it up - radon decays by emitting alpha particles. Very dangerous in ingested or inhaled, but they are readily absorbed by materials and their penetrating power is limited. So the metal casing of a refrigerator may well provide enough shielding to protect the paper.
    Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery;None but ourselves can free our minds. - Bob Marley

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hollis, NH
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    732
    Images
    3
    Anyway - ordered some Fuji CA and fresh RA-4 developer from Adorama. I've never gotten a bad product from them, so I assume both the paper and developer will be fresh. Hopefully things will go better.
    Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery;None but ourselves can free our minds. - Bob Marley

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    third stone from the sun
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    732
    Radon gas in NH is fogging your paper? Could be but the more obvious cause would be expired and poorly stored stock. I know that there are quite a few threads on this site boasting the longevity of RA4 papers. I would not put too much faith in these testimonials (consider that the largest population of people having difficulty differentiating color are men 40 years and older). I just tossed a box of Endura f surface 8x10 (expiration 6/11) that had been stored in a chest freezer because the color shift to yellow was too severe to correct without a dramatic shift in the rest of the spectrum. The difference between that paper and another box of endura f (expiration 12/11) was dramatic. Considering the low cost of color paper and the labor involved in making ra4 prints why would anyone want to print with bad stock?

  4. #24
    David Lyga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,350
    'Off whites' are why I always wondered if there cannot, somehow, be a 'Farmers Reducer' for color paper in order to 'bring back the whites'. How nice that would be. - David Lyga

  5. #25
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,556
    Images
    65
    If you have radon gas in your basement, you are likely to die of lung cancer before your paper is too badly fogged from the radiation. Yes, all color and B&W papers fog with time if kept at room temp. The Kodak product yellows gradually and loses a bit of red speed so the color balance must be adjusted.

    The tests to run are as follows:

    In total darkness....

    Sheet #1
    Blix, wash dry. This is the reference white.

    Sheet #2
    Develop, blix, wash, dry. This is the test for dmin.

    Do this for a fresh sheet and a kept sheet and compare all 4 sheets.

    PE

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hollis, NH
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    732
    Images
    3
    The thing that is so troubling about this is that none of my paper is showing a yellow shift. Both the CA and the Endura I tested last night are essentially grey. I'm sure light leaks aren't the problem as my darkroom is in my basement and last night I was working down there with the basement lights off. So I had a darkroom inside of a dark basement.
    I do believe the paper I got from Ultrafineonline was fogged by a safelight when they were cutting it - that paper had a strong cyan cast to it.

    The only reason I brought up radon is there is another thread here where someone ( I thought it was you PE, but I might be wrong ) stated that the aging of paper is caused by cosmic radiation. But maybe that's way off base.

    In any case, I've resigned myself to the fact that I need to get new paper and chemistry from a reputable dealer - namely Adorama. Yet another delay which wouldn't be a problem except for the fact that we just bought a new house. We're moving on Friday, and I'll no longer have a darkroom until I build on in the new house.

    I have a place where I can probably set up an enlarger temporarily and I can process in the bathroom using my Jobo, but I'll lose my tempered water and be back to messing around with a conventional faucet and a lab thermometer - a time-consuming and frustrating process.
    Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery;None but ourselves can free our minds. - Bob Marley

  7. #27
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,556
    Images
    65
    Aging of film or paper is caused by both heat and radiation. The faster the material the faster it ages. Heat aging can cause fog, contrast changes, and speed changes. Radiation damage generally shows up as fog.

    Frozen materials or refrigerated materials age primarily by radiation damage due to the lower temperature. However, radiation damage is so slight with papers that it should not be a problem. But, I have never had to deal with radon.

    PE

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    809
    with some of the recently outdated endura, the only difference I can notice (yellowing) is on the paper borders, not in the actual print itself. If that is the only place it is noticed, then effectively it's a non-issue IMNSHO.

    frotog, sounds like something was wrong with that paper other than age. I have older endura than that that still prints fine. As to questioning testimonials re: longevity of color and ability of us over-40 men to differentiate, take this test and tell us how you do. Then at least we will know what your discrimination ability is. ;-)

    http://www.colormunki.com/game/huetest_kiosk/

    dslater: good luck with the move and new products from adorama. hopefully that will cure things. I live in NH too, LMK if you need anything in getting a new darkroom set up (presuming you are still in NH area possibly...) Not sure how you process color, but my output improved a lot after switching from single-shot drum usage (cibachrome drums) to a replenished tabletop processor (Fujimoto Cp-31).

    FWIW,

    -Ed

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hollis, NH
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    732
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by EdSawyer View Post
    dslater: good luck with the move and new products from adorama. hopefully that will cure things. I live in NH too, LMK if you need anything in getting a new darkroom set up (presuming you are still in NH area possibly...) Not sure how you process color, but my output improved a lot after switching from single-shot drum usage (cibachrome drums) to a replenished tabletop processor (Fujimoto Cp-31).

    FWIW,

    -Ed
    Hi Ed,
    I like the idea of a better print processor. Does this http://www.ebay.com/itm/Fujimoto-Pho...ht_3879wt_1396 Fujimoto Cp-31 look like it's complete?
    Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery;None but ourselves can free our minds. - Bob Marley

  10. #30

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Daventry, Northamptonshire, England
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    7,158
    Quote Originally Posted by EdSawyer View Post
    with some of the recently outdated endura, the only difference I can notice (yellowing) is on the paper borders, not in the actual print itself. If that is the only place it is noticed, then effectively it's a non-issue IMNSHO.

    -Ed
    That has been my limited experience as well. I have a pack of oldish 5x7 endura and it is the paper borders that show a slight yellow. The prints seem fine.

    pentaxuser

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin