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  1. #1

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    Rising cost of transparency film

    With 35mm Velvia now costing around £9 a roll, I've virtually abandoned using it in favour of 100asa Ektar costing around £3.80-£4.00 for a 35mm roll. The 120 size is also reasonably priced compared to tranny film. With the greatly improved colour neg emulsions now available, have many other pros or semi-pros made a similar move into colour neg. film? If so which one do you favour.

    Also have buyers such as stock libraries noticed any difference in quality of submitted images?...The ones I supply don't seem bothered by the switch, so long as the scans are OK. The overall contrast is usually lower on neg., but on bright sunny days that can be an advantage.

    If there is steady drift from tranny to neg., then what future is there for Velvia or Provia at their current sky high prices?

  2. #2
    wildbill's Avatar
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    Stock buyers buying images shot on film? Ha, that's funny. And no, they don't care. The market is saturated. As for costs, suck it up or get one of those d cameras. I don't shoot 35mm much at all since 36 exp is way too many to scan at once.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  3. #3
    donkee's Avatar
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    I have switched to Fui Provia 100 since it is decent and the cost isn't too terrible.

    I love transparencies and use them with my Vivitar Polaroid printer for lifts and transfers.

    I'll use it till the prices double then I will use my polaroid cameras for the job.

    I would trade off one of my sons if they would offer it in bulk (not really but my sons don't know that).

  4. #4

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    Ha! Start shooting 8X10 color film and you'll never complain about the price of 35mm again. The reason they end up costing about the same is that with the small cameras it's a temptation to waste
    a lot of shots. Just how many are real "keepers" anyway?

  5. #5
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    I called into Jessops earlier this week and they wanted £13 for a roll of 135 Fuji Provia , I told the guy I just wanted the film not to buy shares in the company, and Fuji Film UK are selling it on line at half that price.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 08-23-2012 at 03:37 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  6. #6
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Counting pennies when purchasing film is no longer like counting pennies when purchasing gasoline. The worldwide market for the latter is bigger than ever and growing, while the market for the former is smaller than it's been in many decades and shrinking.

    According to a recent post by Mirko at Fotoimpex—who should know since he just returned from a visit to them—purchasers counting pennies are what did Efke in.

    It's a different world now.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  7. #7
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Since Kodak stopped manufacturing E6 films Fuji has the monopoly, which doesn't help.
    Ben

  8. #8
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Very true. But the point is still valid and still dangerous.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  9. #9
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    Ha! Start shooting 8X10 color film and you'll never complain about the price of 35mm again. The reason they end up costing about the same is that with the small cameras it's a temptation to waste
    a lot of shots. Just how many are real "keepers" anyway?
    Ain't that the truth. Shooting 35mm and 120 cost me about the same for the same time in the field. 120 film is less expensive per roll, more per shot, and I take fewer shots, plus I still finish a roll in a reasonable time instead of having three cameras loaded with three different films for several weeks until I shoot again. 4x5 actually costs me considerably LESS to shoot. On a good day I might go out for a few hours and expose 4-6 sheets, and that includes doing two of anything that really strikes me on the ground glass (some dust insurance, though I'm as careful as I can be given my circumstances) and, occasionally if light is tricky, a couple of shots at different exposures. You can also shoot more than one at the same exposure, develop the first and evaluate it then determine if you need plus or minus development of the other one, if you're unsure. Still comes out cheaper, it's so much slower and more contemplative.

    I'd suggest, for those changing films away from a favorite because of cost, a different approach. There used to be a saying (I first read this in the 70s) "film is the cheapest thing in photography." Well it wasn't true then and it isn't true now. The cheapest thing in photography is a look through the viewfinder or at the ground glass. Slow down and take fewer shots and make them count. Just because you've focused and composed, or even waited for a moving subject to hit a certain point or whatever, doesn't mean you have to release the shutter. Go out with the intention of shooting no more than some arbitrary but small number of frames, maybe five or three or even just one, and try to make those count. With practice your film costs will go down and your photographs will improve.

    This is one of the big reasons that getting into large format has improved all my photography including 35mm.

  10. #10
    Hatchetman's Avatar
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    I just dropped off a roll of E6 for processing ($15.85) and "presentation" scans for $16. Balance due: $34.88

    Shooting film is not supposed to make you feel so bad. LOL.

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