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  1. #1

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    Should I be shooting this @ ISO100 rather than ISO160? Image a bit dark??

    Hi all, this is Porta 160, backlit with reflector to the front as fill. I metered the dark hair from the front and put is Zone III. Would you say this looks a little dark? I have a shoot on Sunday with the same film and wondered if I set me meter to ISO 100 instead of the 160?


    Would like to know what you think.

    Thanks

    Paul
    Speed Graphic, Fuji GX680,Pentax 67, Mamiya RZ67, Mamiya 645 1000s, Nikon F5, Nikon Fm2

  2. #2

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    I can't see the pic (box with red-x) but it sounds like you need to change your lighting or metering... one way or another. I don't adjust for ineffective (not intended to be offensive, just descriptive of you not getting results you like) lighting or exposure by changing ASA, personally.

  3. #3
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I question whether placing the hair in Zone III is appropriate here.

    And I wonder whether the entire image is just displayed too dark. Try lightening it a bit, in order to get the face and dress where you want it.

    The highlights should be blown out slightly in a back-lighted image like this.

    And it seems to me that the face and the dress should be your target when you meter.

    You can then decide for yourself what other parts of the scene (with all its inherently large subject brightness range) need to be protected, even if other parts may have to be sacrificed.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #4

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    You can see it, Matt????

  5. #5
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    You can see it, Matt????
    I'm tempted to say no, to make you really wonder Brian.

    But yes, I can see it.

    Sometimes when I have the same problem with attached images (no image visible - just a red "x"), re-booting the computer makes the difference.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #6

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    Thanks. I've been having lots of slowness and weird stuff on my computer today. I'm rebooting now.

  7. #7

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    This is a backlighted portrait, which is a difficult exposure situation. Normally, you open up to compensate; placing the skin tones in the face a bit below Zone VI (in this case). Negative film generally handles this pretty well, without blocking up the overexposed background. But in this case you have some rather delicate tonalities in the background. I would probably opt for a diffused fill in flash, but not too much.

    More generally, if your pictures seem to be a bit dark, don't be afraid to rate your film at a lower speed. Cameras and meters have various errors that can cause the exposure to be off, and your technique can also cause a consistent bias one way or another. You fix that by adjusting the film speed you actually use.

  8. #8

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    Might be just me but the hair is backlit as I'd expect and looks right. The hair in the shade is dark brown as I'd expect from your description of it and the model's ethnic background. Her skin looks right for a contre jour shot. If she looked "brighter" it would look false. She is supposed to look "shady" in the light conditions sense of the word.

    In other words, everything looks right and fits the light conditions. I'd change nothing but as I said that's just me. I may be in a minority of one.

    pentaxuser

  9. #9

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    Why bother with the Zone system on color neg? Just use an incident meter on the shadow side or spot meter in camera and you're set. I shoot backlit subjects often and neither method has failed me.

    Personally, it is too dark. She is the same tone as the background and she doesn't stand out from it.

  10. #10

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    This would look fine with a small dose of fill flash within the range of, say, -2/3 f to -2 f.

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