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  1. #1
    Andre Noble's Avatar
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    Fuji vs Kodak E6 Films Color Stability Time

    I just made an interesting observation when going back to my 2004 color slide film shots. Noticeable fading on Kodak E100SW and E100G as compared to Fuji RDP and RVP.

    I am surprised.

    On the other hand, underexposed Kodak above still looks good.

    But still, Fuji definitely winner here.
    Andre Noble, Beverly Hills California http://andrenoble.com/

  2. #2
    Lionel1972's Avatar
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    Only from 2004? I have some Kodak non-kodachrome consumer color slides I took 20 years ago that still look the same I ever remembered them. I rarely projected them though and kept them at room temp in their racks inside dark boxes. I thought the fading and shifting issues in color slides had been addressed decades ago.

  3. #3
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    I share Lionel's experience and have some Ektachrome slides from the 80s that look fine. Some of my posted slides are from that era.

    I would suspect a process problem such as using no (or the wrong) stabilizer with the Ektachrome. It is quite sensitive to such process errors!

    PE

  4. #4
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Well, maybe Fuji is not a universal winner.
    Among my not-inconsiderable collection of mounted trannies from years ago, several Fuji Velvia 50 shot in 1996 are fading; my lab noticed this when scanning, and made the curious observation that Fuji transparencies will last longer if periodically projected. Provia is known to have a better archival storage life, as opposed to Velvia.

    I dunno about Ektachrome: I could never stomach the stuff. Meanwhile, over at Kodak...we all know that the longevity of Kodachrome slides is legendary; indeed, my own from 1970 to 1995 (when I switched to Fuji) are still raising eyebrows for colour fidelity, stored away in sleeves and boxes, and Kodachrome is frequently cited as being much better at rendering reds than any of the Fujichrome emulsions — an observation made by several Ilfochrome Classic printers here in Australia about a decade ago.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    One beautiful image is worth
    a thousand hours of therapy.


    "It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government
    to save the environment."
    .::Ansel Adams






  5. #5

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    Would using 3-bath kits cause any problems longevity wise? I do not trust the blix provided, so I blix for two minutes above the reccomended 6, then fix for 3 minutes in fresh 1 + 4 fixer. With reguards to the dyes, how many times can the stabilizer be reused? I will be using ektachrome 100 super-8 stock and maybe some fuji / agfa (agfaphoto) slide film. My E-6 stabilizer doubles up as the best effective wetting agent for black and white negatives, but was wondering if the stabilizer could be bought separately. The tetenal E6 Stabilizer is of the low formaldehyde type so even mixing say 5 to 10 ml formalin 37% to 1L of water plus some wetting agent? I aim to store them in cool dark places, how long would it be before the dyes begin to degrade?

    As for kodachrome that has proven to be one of the most archival colour image mediums to date, given that the dyes were very stable and added during processing.

    I definitely want them viewable for years to come!

  6. #6
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    If ANY E6 process omits treatment with Formalin, then the stability of Kodak Ektachrome films will be less than optimal. Also, errors in pH can affect the stability.

    PE

  7. #7
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    I think it's very difficult to make an accurate comparison unless they have all been processed together at the same lab, although when I look at my old slides and colour prints I shot 20+ years ago I do notice that the ones that were processed at good professional labs both Kodak and Fuji films seem to have fared better over time.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 09-03-2012 at 04:19 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  8. #8

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    What is the optimal pH of e6? Also how much difference can it tolerate for ensuring the dyes are stable?

  9. #9
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    The pH range is about 5.5 - 6.8 and the optimum is about 6.0 - 6.5

    PE

  10. #10

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    I haven't seen any evidence of fading on any transparecies in my collection, whether Kodachrome or
    E6 from Fuji or Kodak. And I've got stuff going way back, even pre-E6 Agfachromes. But it's all carefully stored. I have also inherited some very old stuff taken by others, in which the culprit was improper storage in humid areas (mold damage).



 

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