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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by newcan1 View Post
    PE to make bleach as you described, could one use ferric chloride instead of ferric bromide? It seems to be much cheaper. Or ferric ammonium sulfate.
    There are advantages and disadvantages to every chemical. I've used Ferric Ammonium Sulfate, but Sulfate inhibits swell, so there is one big disadvantage.

    You would have to experiment anyhow, to come up with the right mix. I suggest that you use published formulas.

    PE

  2. #42

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    I have a few boxes of C-41RA developer replenisher with Part C being too old and gone bad. That's a couple of hundred liters of developer gone bad. Recently I went ahead to mix 10 liters of it without part C. I also mixed the right amount of starter to it so it is a complete stock developer without part C. I took ome liter of this developer and added 5 grams of CD-4. The CD-4 powder is something that is ay least 25 years old that I bought in the 80'.

    I used this one liter developer and developed quite a few Kodak Ektar 100, Portra VC, Fuji NPS and even a few rolls of Kodak VPS-3 and a roll of Pro100. All were 220 except the Ektar that was a 120. I developed the Ektar first and it was the very best negative I ever produced. I proceeded to reuse the developer and see at which point it would crap out on me. I think I developed a total of 10 rolls of 220 and a roll of 120 (Ektar). I was very surprised that the colors were all acceptable with no obvious color crossover that makes scanning difficult.

    The first 4 rolls I developed at 3 min 15 sec standard time at 100 degree F. The rest I extended the time to 3 min 30 sec. I used 470 ml each time for 2 rolls of 220. My processor is a Jobo ATL-2300.

    So what I am getting at is old CD-4 powder does last 25 years long or longer. I kept it in a plastic bottle all these years and it looks grey today. But it works great still. Now I am on a quest to buy 500 grams or 1 kg. Where can I get it at a good price?

    If you have part C gone bad from your C-41 developer don't throw it away.

  3. #43
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    Well, since most of the sulfite is in part C, there will be some degree of problem, but you might not see it easily.

    PE

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    Thanks and what Can I do about it, PE? I hate to waste so much otherwise good chemicals into the drain.

  5. #45
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    Well, look at the posted C41 developer formulas and then put in some sulfite to match that in the formulas. I would test part A and part B for sulfite by adding some acid to it and sniffing. It would only take a few drops of the concentrates and a few drops of acid. If you smell sulfur dioxide, then there is some on those parts. If there is, use less in part C.

    Here is an example. Lets say that you need 10 g/l total Sodium Sulfite. If you smell no SO2 odor in parts A and B when acid is added,, then add 10 g/l to the final formula. Adjust the pH. If you smell SO2 when you add acid, then add 5g/l Sodium Sulfite. Adjust he pH.

    To adjust the pH, you will need some Sodium Hydroxide solution or some Acetic Acid solution depending on the final pH.

    Good luck.

    PE

  6. #46

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    Thanks again, PE. I just looked at the bottles of the C-41RA LORR replenisher that I have. It says the Part A bottle contains Potassium Carbonate, the Part B bottle contains Hydroxylamine Sulfate and the Part C contains CD4 and Sodium Bisulfite. Does this mean I need 5 gram/l to add to the solution after mixing 5 grams of CD4 into it? The Part B bottle has Sulfate in it. I don't have a PH meter. I don't think I am capable of adjusting PH. I believe these bottles contains more chemicals not shown on the labels.

    The developer without adding Sulfate somehow had worked very well for me. What would happen if I continue to use it as is? You said it may be hard to see the difference but what is the difference? I think getting bulk CD4 is already a challenge. I may just consume all the CD4 I have then forget about the remaining stock pile of the developer with bad Part C.

  7. #47
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    You will probably need the entire quantity of Sodium Sulfite indicated in the formula. I don't have it in front of me right now.

    But, pH is critical. CD4 is an acid salt of an organic base, but the part C is the free base of CD4 with Bisulfite. So..... I cannot give you exact figures. Kodak Powders and Solution division had it figured out based on their formulas, but I, alas, do not.

    PE

  8. #48

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    OK, I will look up the C-41 formula and see how much Soldium Sulfite will be needed. It is a cheap chemical and easy to get. The hard part will be adjusting PH without a PH meter. Actually I have one but the probe is shot. I tried to learn how to use one and found it not so trivial to calibrate it. I also got test strips but the accuracy will be questionable. Any tips for adjusting PH without a PH meter? Thanks a lot, PE.

  9. #49
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    No thoughts on this.

    A pH meter is easy to calibrate and use though. One button to calibrate and another to use.

    Good luck.

    PE

  10. #50

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    Maybe I overlooked how simple it is to use a PH meter. I remember I had to get a standard (PH = 7.0) liquid and had the probe sunk in it at all time as the storage. But over time that standard liquid would be contaminated and had to be replaced. I tried distilled water as a calibration point of PH 7.0. It never worked that way. Any way, I will do more research about using a PH meter. I do have one with a very large meter (analog) on it.

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