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  1. #11
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snaggs View Post
    My friend has a lab so I can store some film at -80c for nothing, or -77k for about $150 a year to cover LN2 consumption. Anybody else looked at this? What do I use for radiation? Are full lead containers required? I wont be stored with the nuclear isotopes but in the bio storage, so im only concerned with background radiation.

    Daniel.
    The only real issue with extreme cold is that it takes a lot longer to come up to normal temperature and it's a lot more fragile until it does. At -15℃ you need to be careful winding film because it can break in the camera. At -80℃ a roll that gets dropped could shatter. BTW the coldest that LN2 can make something is 77K because LN2 itself boils at 77K and freezes at 63K....
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  2. #12
    Brian C. Miller's Avatar
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    I have used B&W film that was frozen for 20 years and it had no fog. Stuff that was opened, and then frozen, has typically had about 1/2-inch of fog at the opened end. Other than that, nothing. I suspect that film fogging is actually due to local radiation, so it varies with your location.

  3. #13

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    If you are talking about B&W then fog is really not an issue. You can just print through the fog.
    Loss of contrast is a bigger issue but again with B&W it is easy to adjust for as long as you have several rolls of film from the same batch. Once you know how to develop one roll you can use the same method for the other rolls in the batch.
    The real issue is fade of color dyes and the fact they fade at different rates. Low temperature will slow down the fade of these dyes.

  4. #14
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    Some years ago I did give it a try at -80 °C with polyester based B&W film. After defrosting slowly, 1 day at -40 °C, 1 day at -20 °C and 1 day at +4 °C, the emulsion had signs of freezer burn at some places and cracks on other places. I didn't try other defrosting cycles.

    I have no problems so far with film stored at -40 °C but most of my film is stored at -20 °C

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