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  1. #1
    Matthew Cherry's Avatar
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    Having a problem processing Provia with Tetenal E-6 Kit

    Hello All!

    So I just started processing my own color film with a Jobo processor. I developed a few 4x5 sheets of Provia the other week and noticed it was warm when finished. I thought, maybe I just had made a mistake mixing the chemistry or with the times.

    The other day I shot a roll of 120 Provia 100F as well as a roll of Ektachrom 100GX. I processed both at the same time using the same chemistry.

    The Ektachrome looks perfect. Spot on. The Provia, once again, is way too red.

    As a result, I think my processing is ok, but I need to somehow compensate for the Fuji Film.

    Any advice APUGers????

  2. #2
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    A reddish cast with E-6 could be the result of too high processing temperature.
    I have no idea why the Ektachrome came out correctly and the Provia came out too red.

    Maybe your Jobo drum is not perfectly horizontal, one half doesn't sit well in the water and develops "cooler" (Ektachrome) while the other is warmer.

    At which temperature do you set the Jobo? How many minutes of first developer?

    I have a Jobo CPP2 with "lift", I set the temperature at 38.3, the speed between P and 6.

    In general Fujichrome film needs a bit more development time than Kodak (different thickness of the emulsion, or whatever).
    The canonic 6:30 become 7:00 or even 7:30 for Astia.
    You should develop Astia and Kodak film separately and, through tests, determine the correct development time in your setup for each film*.

    The difference between 6:30 and 7:30 corresponds to around half a stop.

    YMMV

    * I know in theory E-6 is E-6 is E-6, but practice and theory sometimes diverge.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
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  3. #3
    Matthew Cherry's Avatar
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    I also have a Jobo CPP2 with "lift". I set the dials to 39.7 but measure both the bath and chemistry with photo thermometers. Each is stabilized right at 100 degrees F before I start, as is the rinse water. Pre-soak is carried out with the same pre-warmed water. The unit is properly leveled.

    I developed both for 6:30. I will shoot another roll of provia and test with a longer time. Do you shoot Provia 100f? If so, what development time do you use?
    Last edited by Matthew Cherry; 09-23-2012 at 09:05 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #4
    Matthew Cherry's Avatar
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    It doesn't seem to matter much now - the rotation motor stopped working. I really hoping it's the fuse.....

  5. #5
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Sorry for the motor.
    Here on APUG there are threads with alternative motors to be installed.
    It's also possible IIRC that the motor should be dismounted and cleaned/revised.

    Never shot Provia.

    39.7 °C seems too warm and could be the cause of the green cast.

    I set at 38.3 and let all the system reach the same temperature by leaving it on for more than half an hour, even an hour with heating on and pump on. That way the entire mass (water, Jobo, beaker, flasks, tank) will come close to 38.3.
    Actually I turn the Jobo on with water this way, and then begin preparing the solutions, so that for the entire time I employ to prepare the bath the Jobo is warming up. And after I finished preparing the last bath, I wait for at least half an hour more before processing.

    EDIT There is a safety reversible fuse that "trips" in case of overheating or some other problem. It can be rearmed manually. It is located on the left side of the Jobo, there should be a sticker with a writing "overheating protection" or such. By the way, the Jobo must not be operated without water.
    Last edited by Diapositivo; 09-24-2012 at 02:27 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
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  6. #6

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    I have the same kit and I develop both sheet and 120 E6. I've never had a color cast issue, but had one roll with blown highlights which I found out was due to the fact that I decided to spin the reels in the tank instead of using the inversion method.

    My temps are always off a few degrees here and there, but so far no major issues that can't be corrected at the enlarger (of that thing on my desk)

  7. #7

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    Congratulations on starting home E6! Easy and you will save yourself $$$ plus excellent quality. Dont know about the red cast, check the manual that came with the Tetenal kit, it has specific instructions for this with Fuji, Kodak, and Agfa films. As for the JOBO, hope it is just a fuse, but that is exactly why I dont want one. Big upfront cost, then the issues with maintenance. Really, you dont need it. A Paterson 5 reel hand tank is fine, inexpensive, and maybe even better results than JOBO. So if JOBO is broken, spend $50 on this and you will be set to do 5 35mm or 3 120 at a time.



 

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