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  1. #1

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    What ASA for shooting Ektachrome

    I have a pro-pack of Ektachrome E 100VS from 2003 that has been kept refridgerated. I have heard is is better to slightly under expose slide film for more saturated colors. Should I shoot it at ASA 125, 160 or just shoot it at ASA 100.
    I guess I could shoot 1/3 of the roll at each of these speeds to test the first roll. I will have 4 rolls left after I shoot this. I got the film free at a Photo Club meeting when a pro photog. was retiring, so I have no money tied up in it.
    I will probably use my Nikon FM2n and a Zeiss 50mm f/1.4 lens.
    When I finish the roll, I will probably send it to Dwayne's Photo Lab, unless someone recommends a better lab.

  2. #2
    chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
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    I have not shot the VS, but Ektachrome 100G and 100GX were favorites of mine that looked just fine at 100 using an incident meter. What you could do is shoot each frame twice, one at normal EI-100 exposure and one a half-stop under. With the G and GX versions, a third stop didn't make a great deal of difference, a half stop less exposure came out a bit darker than normal. The VS might be different. I'd just use one roll and shoot several scenes at normal, 1/2 under and maybe even one stop under. Develop it and see what versions you preferred, then shoot everything else that way. You'll waste less film experimenting if you use one roll to test and shoot the other four the way the tests indicated was best.
    Chris Crawford
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    Fort Wayne, Indiana

  3. #3

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    Thanks, for the answer.

  4. #4
    Hatchetman's Avatar
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    I shoot it at box speed and have no complaints. Toughest film to scan, by far, in my experience. Looks great projected.

  5. #5
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Box speed. These (and to an even greater extent Velvia) are sort of exceptions to underexposing slide film slightly. Both already have saturation to spare, which is the reason people used to underexpose slide film, and both (particularly Velvia) are quite contrasty. Box speed is ideal but with these, if I had to err with these, I'd err on the side of 1/3 stop MORE exposure, as that would reduce the contrast slightly. But slide film in general and highly saturated and contasty films in particular have little latitude. Carefully metered box speed is best.

    FWIW, I personally always preferred E100VS to Velvia as being not quite as hard to deal with in contrast while still having really high saturation.

  6. #6
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Will its speed have changed due to age/conditions under which it was stored?
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  7. #7
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveO View Post
    I have a pro-pack of Ektachrome E 100VS from 2003 that has been kept refridgerated. I have heard is is better to slightly under expose slide film for more saturated colors. Should I shoot it at ASA 125, 160 or just shoot it at ASA 100.
    I guess I could shoot 1/3 of the roll at each of these speeds to test the first roll. I will have 4 rolls left after I shoot this. I got the film free at a Photo Club meeting when a pro photog. was retiring, so I have no money tied up in it.
    I will probably use my Nikon FM2n and a Zeiss 50mm f/1.4 lens.
    When I finish the roll, I will probably send it to Dwayne's Photo Lab, unless someone recommends a better lab.
    I think the best option, take one roll, find a subject that needs to push the capabilities of the film, set your meter at 25 take a shot, reset your meter at 50 take a shot, then 75, 100,150,200 make sure you indicate in the frame which setting, which image is taken with. Now find another scene, that is typical of your photographic style and repeat the process, then again with a colour chart. Get the roll processed, then put these slides side by side on a light table, and see which is the closest to reality. Using that camera, you then know which speed to set it at.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  8. #8

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    I've shot VS pretty much exclusively for over a decade, and always at the rated speed. The saturation is beautiful, and the colors and contrast very natural. You will start noticing a slight difference once you get to 1/2 stop off. But since I only shoot Oly's, correct metering has never been a problem.

  9. #9
    cliveh's Avatar
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    As others have said, box speed. It has been well stored, whats the problem?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon



 

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