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  1. #21
    polyglot's Avatar
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    Eh, C41 is pretty forgiving - you can correct most minor errors in the printing stage to RA4 and you can correct the most gross errors of development (except contaminated developer) including colour crossover if you're scanning. If you're comfortable with B&W, you should give C41 a go.

    If you've got a Jobo or similar, it's trivial.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Eh, C41 is pretty forgiving - you can correct most minor errors in the printing stage to RA4 and you can correct the most gross errors of development (except contaminated developer) including colour crossover if you're scanning. If you're comfortable with B&W, you should give C41 a go.

    If you've got a Jobo or similar, it's trivial.
    Not quite clear what RA4 means, or what a Jobo is. Sorry, not quite a film aficionado, just somewhat experienced with B/W development and printing.

    As far as developing and printing goes, my uni provides all the chemistry for developing the film. We have enlargers for printing, and a machine that develops the print for us. Not sure of the make and model, its just a really big machine as far as I know Haven't taken the time to see what it is yet.
    I shoot both film and digital equipment.
    chinesenapaj.smugmug.com

  3. #23
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    RA4 is the chemical process for making colour prints on paper. It is designed to work in conjunction with C41 so that you can expose RA4 paper in an enlarger through a C41 negative and that produces a positive print.

    A Jobo is a rotary processor with temperature control. If you're developing at home instead of at your uni's lab, a Jobo is a common way to get temperature control for colour.

  4. #24

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    Ah, thanks for the clarification. Yeah, since our uni has a lab where I'll be developing and printing it isn't as much of a worry to me. I want to try and make use of our photo facilities here as much as possible, and try out color while I can for almost free £35 lab fee for using all the facilities and chemistry for developing film and printing a semester isn't too bad, before graduating
    I shoot both film and digital equipment.
    chinesenapaj.smugmug.com

  5. #25

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    Right now, things are in a bit of a flux. I'm using up my existing stocks of Portra 400VC, and I have a few rolls of Ektar left for something where I can use it effectively. Despite medium format and heavier equipment with tripods, I still behave pretty much like a snapshot taker. I concentrate on the scene and not the settings. That makes me appreciate negative films. My guess is that I will stick with Portra. I'll probably use 160 mostly, but 400 has its uses. I haven't used Fuji negative film for a while, but when I did, I preferred the Kodak films.

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