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  1. #11
    destroya's Avatar
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    I did list the tenetal as an option above, #2. at this point I'll not rule out anything. I ordered the rollei kit as it was the cheapest. i shot a few rolls of K gold 200 and fuji 200 to get a few roles to experiment with. IF this goes well then I'll give E-6 a shot. I get great results using walmart mailer/Fuji development with my E-6, but having to wait a week and half to get the results..... well you know how that is.

    BVY, thanks for the link. I'll check it out. might have to go to Keeble and shuchat ans see if they have any of that chemical in stock. They have a ton of B&W chems but only a handful of color. Areyou saying that I should replace the rollei stabilizer with the Kodak final rinse?

  2. #12
    bvy
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    Yes, I would just toss the kit stabilizer. The final rinse is all you need, and the concentrate lasts forever. I believe I used 4.5ml to 500ml distilled water. I soak for ninety seconds, gently agitating for the first thirty. Then hang to dry.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by destroya View Post
    I get great results using walmart mailer/Fuji development with my E-6, but having to wait a week and half to get the results..... well you know how that is.
    I was in the same boat a few weeks ago. I decided to bring everything home and I couldn't be happier. I can do the C41 and E-6 processing quicker than I can download files from a digital!

    Quote Originally Posted by destroya View Post
    I did list the tenetal as an option above, #2. at this point I'll not rule out anything.

    Just to clarify, I thought you were referring to the liquid kit like this:

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    What I was referring to is the Tetenal C41 powder kit (essentially made by Jobo) like this available from B&H. Its the same as the Unicolor kit available from Freestyle.

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  4. #14

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    Kodak does not recommend reusing their Flexicolor developer. This makes the choice of a tank an economic one. A SS reel and tank uses 240 ml per roll while plastic reels and tanks typically use 300 ml or more. For 1 liter of developer this means you can only develop 3 rolls with the plastic tanks as opposed to 4 rolls with the SS.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  5. #15

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    I was having issues with my local lab (developing price and poor scanning was in the $7 a roll region), so I got the powered kit from B&H (C-41) and was amazed at how easy it was to develop my own film. My suggestion is try the power first, it's cheap to try and if it works for you....there you go, your in business. If it doesn't, time for the liquid kits.

    Being stupid, I am considering the liquid kits despite overwhelming success with the powered kit. Why? Don't remember now. Only done C-41. And about ready to order my first E-6 because I want to impress my wife with medium format slides.

    Bvy, thanks for your formula, I will try that on my next developing session.

    Bob E.
    Nikon F5, Nikon F4S, Nikon FA, Nikon FE, Nikon N90, Nikon N80, Nikon N75, Mamiya 645 Pro, Mamiya Press Super 23, Yashica Lynx 14e, Yashica Electro GSN, Yashica 124G, Yashica D

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmallick View Post



    Just to clarify, I thought you were referring to the liquid kit like this:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    What I was referring to is the Tetenal C41 powder kit (essentially made by Jobo) like this available from B&H. Its the same as the Unicolor kit available from Freestyle.
    I think that is the one i was referring to. Its this one at freestyle. I prefer the liquid as i can mix what i need and kep the concetrate in its original bottle, unlike my XTOL which i have to do 5L all at once.
    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/102228...er?cat_id=1001

  7. #17

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    There is supposed to be an agent in the Flexicolor stabilizer that "sets" the color of the negatives to make it more permanent. In the older days, formaldehyde did the job, but after that hit the unwanted chemicals list, there are only traces of it left in the solution. Not sure what component does the "stabilizing" now, but I've used it for many years, as well as the Fuji Hunt and Russell varieties, and the film is definitely stable.

    The E6 stabilizer has a slightly different composition, again, supposedly to stabilize the color of the dried film.

    A good film wiper (or lint-free paper towel) needs to be used to remove the foam and excess stabilizer so the film can dry smoothly.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Kodak does not recommend reusing their Flexicolor developer....
    These hobby kits are not designed for replenishment, but I'm sure you could process at least 2 batches in the same soup. That is if you don't care about the quality of the 2nd batch as much as you do about the first. There will be differences between the first "pressing" and the subsequent ones.

    Replenishing:
    You could experiment by replenishing the used developer with some fresh solution. Just realize you can increase the activity of depleted chemicals with replenishment, but you cannot effectively remove the chemicals the film put in there. The 3rd and subsequent batches from the same replenished solution will become even more poluted, and the balance of chemicals becomes very complex.

    Single Shot:
    Since the main reason to process your own film is to obtain best quality and total control, I'd say stick to single shots for the developers.

    Economy:
    I used to buy the 20 liter kits (2x10 liter) from Fuji Hunt (NegaColor) and could process 5 rolls of 35mm (or equivalent) in 600ml solution, using the Jobo 1500 tank series on a CPP2. Very economical and no need to replenish the developer. The opened developer concentrates would last at least 2 months.

    Testing and experimenting:
    I did some qualitative tests on reusing the developer, both with and without replenishing, and concluded that the single shot system gave the highest accutance, and best color, with fewer crossovers. Some may even find the self-processed film to be a bit more contrasty, compared to medium and large lab replenished (and seasoned) tank systems. If contrast is a problem, you can experiment with a slightly diluted developer, say 10%-20% dilution, keeping the time and temperature constant. Reducing time is not wise as 3:15" is shortish already, but you could try.

    I've successfully pushed C41 film 2 stops (and even further) by extending the development time. Try to convince your lab to do that for those 2 rolls.

    Prewetting film is another variable to introduce. Or the use of extra restrainers.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Kodak does not recommend reusing their Flexicolor developer. This makes the choice of a tank an economic one. A SS reel and tank uses 240 ml per roll while plastic reels and tanks typically use 300 ml or more. For 1 liter of developer this means you can only develop 3 rolls with the plastic tanks as opposed to 4 rolls with the SS.
    I've found that 200 ml barely covers a 35mm roll in a SS tank. Maybe the top 1 mm of film isn't covered, but there's no image there, just edge-markings and sprocket-holes, and we don't care if they're underdeveloped. So 1 litre of developer gives you 5 rolls.

    Mark Overton

  10. #20

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    The big problem with home darkrooms is usually the lack of processing quantity. Not many shoot and develop 5 or 10 rolls each week. So it's difficult to be economical by buying larger quantities of developer. Once you open the concentrates the clock starts ticking.

    I remember that the hobby kits have instructions on how to reuse the developer to process more rolls in the same soup. Usually by extending the process time for each subsequent roll or batch. That way you could process 20 rolls from a liter of developer, using it 4 times.

    In my early days I would do that, process one roll at a time and reuse the developer 3 times with slightly extended process times for each additional roll to compensate for the depletion of the developer. Even when using the developer up in the same day (4 batches), I saw differences in the subsequent batches. The effects of reusing are particularly noticeable in the edge markings, and are harder to detect in the image area, until you print.

    You do have to make sure the roll is totally covered in solution, or you'll get processing marks in the image area, and don't neglect the effects from sprocket hole surging in scant solutions.

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