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  1. #11

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    Fuji CA used to come in two types: Type C and Type P. My experience with printing Ektar was that Type C had too much contrast, but Type P was just about perfect. Unfortunately, I no longer see the two types of paper at most online places, so that differentiation might be over. I wonder if anyone else had similar experience with different Fuji papers.

  2. #12

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    I think mine is neither type C nor D. Im using this one:
    Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #13

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    They're a beautifull rendition. Not exactly a scan. Heh. But then again, what justice could a scan possibly do?

    Kodak Gold's interpretation of Ektar printed on Fujifilm Crystal Archive Type II
    http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8054/8...c7b05bdd_b.jpg

  4. #14

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    Thank you Wayne. As I can see you are using the Kodak Color Print Viewing Filter Kit . Ive always wanted to try it but havent purchased one yet. Would you recommend it?

  5. #15

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    Absolutely. It makes my life so much easier. And as I understand, LEE is now making them.

  6. #16

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    Well, I'm just about to calibrate a forty-inch wide roll of polyester-based CAII for printing mainly from Ektar 8x10 film, so it should give you a clue to the faith I put in this combination. And once you
    understand the variables, things even trickier than skintones can be routinely controlled. But it's not
    an artificially warmed film like skintone neg films per se, like Portra 160, for example. But in principle,
    it's not much different than printing on smaller ordinary CAII paper based media. And the difference
    between CAII and the older Super C is very minor in terms of filter settings - the CAII is a little cleaner and more vibrant, but slightly lower over all contrast (not as low as Type P, however). Once you learn the basics you can control contrast either up or down via supplementary unsharp silver
    masking.

  7. #17

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    Sorry to redirect the thread here guys.

    Drew, how are you handling your roll of paper? Do you have a roll paper dispensor of some sort? I've been looking for anything I can find on the market for some rolls of B&W paper I have and want to get into some color rolls as well.

  8. #18

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    I don't really have room in my facility for a commercial XY cutter/feeder. But I do have a 50" rotatrim
    flush mounted to a big formica drating table. There are threaded inserts in the tabletop at critical
    positons so I can position a stainless straightedge using nylon screws. This type of "paper" is rather
    heavy and easily dented, and sadly, they don't offer it in sheets anymore at all. I have a set of cone
    rollers to hold the big roll slightly below the edge of the trimmer. Then another basic linear roller will
    feed it to the Rotatrim blade once I have pulled the paper to the stainless length stop (which is
    precisely squared to another edge). Then I guess I'll carefully slip a "sled" of Gatorboard or plexi
    under the paper to slip it into my 30X40 paper safe on an adjacent table, or to smaller safes (I chose
    40 inch roll width because it is also nice for 20x24 or 20X30 sheets. You can also buy 30 or 32 inch
    wide rolls, which would be easier to handle. When actually in use, I have a plastic sled which transfers my delicate paper from the paper safe right onto the vacuum easel in the dark without
    risk of crinkling it. The transfer from there into the drum rolled-up just takes a little practice - the
    paper is less likely to kink when in a gentle roll. I learned the tricks back when doing big Cibachromes.

  9. #19

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    Drew, by polyester-based CAII do you mean fujiflex? I've been drooling about it for a while, but
    could never justify the cost for something I've never seen live.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by WayneStevenson View Post
    Sorry to redirect the thread here guys.

    Drew, how are you handling your roll of paper? Do you have a roll paper dispensor of some sort? I've been looking for anything I can find on the market for some rolls of B&W paper I have and want to get into some color rolls as well.
    Successful roll paper handling does not need a Rube Goldberg, space-stealing contraption . A simple, fool-proof way to do this is as follows...

    1. If you're working with paper 20" or wider you're in luck as it ships in its own single-roll light-proof box. Take the photo paper out of its box so that you can examine the box with the light on. Make certain that it's actually light proof by putting the two halves together and forcing the top down. This way you'll be able to feel any leaks at the seems as you push down. Tape any leaks you might find with black paper tape.

    2. Determine the length of the print that you'll be making. Tape some nylon cord cut to the same length to the inside of the bottom half of the box. This will be your guide for how much paper to pull off the roll.

    3. Back in the drkrm. you'll want to take your paper out of it's light proof bag and back in its box. Now you're all set to pull your paper off the roll.

    4. Place box on floor and use your guide (Hold the end of the guide in your mouth) to determine how much paper to pull off the roll. Pull with both hands.

    5. Roll the paper up into a fairly tight scroll (4-6") until you get to the lip of the bottom half of the box.

    6. Holding the scroll in the center with one hand, cut along the lip of the box with a straight edge.



    Not only will this technique take up a lot less room than what was described earlier in this thread, it's done vertically which means less chance for stuff to land on the large surface of your paper.

    I have an automatic roll paper cutter that will handle rolls up to 52". It cuts in two directions along the width-wise axis (not sure why you'd want an xy cutter in an analogue drkrm using rolls). But I keep it loaded with rolls of 11" wide paper and don't even bother swapping out the larger rolls because the technique I described above is so ridiculously simple it doesn't warrant the time it takes to swap rolls. Besides, once you get a taste of how expensive the larger sizes can be you'll realize that you won't be going through as many sheets as you'd otherwise would printing with smaller sized sheets.

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