Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,963   Posts: 1,523,274   Online: 1042
      
Page 6 of 15 FirstFirst 123456789101112 ... LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 144
  1. #51
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,030
    Images
    223

    C-41 processing for neophytes

    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I mix up a 5L kit and it lasts me for months in a sealed bottle with no air. Used, I have kept chemistry for 2 - 3 months and fresh up to 6 months, but the key is NO AIR EXPOSURE.

    Actually, I use Nitrogen gas as the 5 L bottle is used, and I store odds and ends in 1L or 1/2L bottles filled to the top.

    PE
    Ok so if I don't have access to nitrogen gas, and only store in the brown glass chemistry bottles (because the owner insists they don't feel comfortable with plastic bottle storage in the basement) then how do you keep it air tight? I've seen marbles mentioned so I tried this, but this only meant spilled marbles into my paterson tank and cracked glass chips in the developer. not putting the marbles in the developer, but when they spilled out while I was filing the paterson tank, some went down the garbage disposal too, it was a disaster...

    That's why I'm trying for smaller bottles of concentrate.

    And you say no air exposure, so this means period right? So how can I mix the powder and water without exposure? Or do you just mean constant air exposure, so if I fill the bottle to the brim and there is just a tiny air bubble, is that good enough for a few months do you think?

    Or is there some tool I'm missing that does this?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  2. #52
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,931
    Images
    65
    Brown bottles are not needed! Clear glass or plastic which prevents air from entering are OK. There are many threads on this subject here on APUG. Either fill the bottles to the top, use marbles or use Nitrogen.

    Your biggest problem is mixing powder with water. This involves a lot of air. Liquid kits involve more air entrainment. I suggest that you look into them. A larger liquid kit with less air is probably better than a solid powder kit with more air during mixing. IDK for sure.

    So, I mix, fill to the top, screw shut and done! In fact, some bottles have concave tops to force tight fits.

    PE

  3. #53
    macandal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    150
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    ...or you can use them several times by increasing the development times according to the chart on the Kodak web site.
    Ok, PE. I'm not one to want everything delivered to him on a platter but I HAVE LOOKED and cannot find this chart on the Kodak site you are referring to. Could you please send me a link to it? Thank you so very much.
    --Mario

  4. #54

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    339
    Images
    11
    Yeah, there are some excellent videos on YouTube where it's demonstrated properly....I believe the one I saw was done by an APUGer.

  5. #55
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,030
    Images
    223

    C-41 processing for neophytes

    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Brown bottles are not needed! Clear glass or plastic which prevents air from entering are OK. There are many threads on this subject here on APUG. Either fill the bottles to the top, use marbles or use Nitrogen.

    Your biggest problem is mixing powder with water. This involves a lot of air. Liquid kits involve more air entrainment. I suggest that you look into them. A larger liquid kit with less air is probably better than a solid powder kit with more air during mixing. IDK for sure.

    So, I mix, fill to the top, screw shut and done! In fact, some bottles have concave tops to force tight fits.

    PE
    Thanks, I was only looking to confirm that the fill to the top method was acceptable thanks!


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #56
    wogster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bruce Peninsula, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,266
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Ok so if I don't have access to nitrogen gas, and only store in the brown glass chemistry bottles (because the owner insists they don't feel comfortable with plastic bottle storage in the basement) then how do you keep it air tight? I've seen marbles mentioned so I tried this, but this only meant spilled marbles into my paterson tank and cracked glass chips in the developer. not putting the marbles in the developer, but when they spilled out while I was filing the paterson tank, some went down the garbage disposal too, it was a disaster...

    That's why I'm trying for smaller bottles of concentrate.

    And you say no air exposure, so this means period right? So how can I mix the powder and water without exposure? Or do you just mean constant air exposure, so if I fill the bottle to the brim and there is just a tiny air bubble, is that good enough for a few months do you think?

    Or is there some tool I'm missing that does this?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    The best thing to do, determine how much you need, say you use a steel tank that holds 250ml, you buy a case of 24 250ml bottles, you need 4 per Litre, so 20 for 5L, you have 4 spares in case some get broken. Get a B&W print tray, and put the first empty bottle in it, and fill to the brim and add the cap, keep doing this until you run out of developer, pour from the tray back into the container and continue on, until all the developer is in bottles. Wash the bottles off and let them dry. Get some plastic wrap or aluminium foil, cut into 6" squares, put this over each cap and seal with electrical tape. Although glass bottles are air tight, they often use plastic lids that are not, so the plastic wrap is an extra air seal. Many developers can live in those bottles air tight for months. The seal is also an indicator to you, that the bottle has not been used. So you should have one or more sealed ones, and one unsealed one. When the developer in a bottle is all used up, you dump it, wash out the bottle, put it with the clean ones and unseal another. One note, a 250ml bottle filled to the brim is probably closer to 275ml, as the bottles are designed to be only partly filled.

    Bleach needs some air, so it can go in a single bottle. Fixer and final rinse don't really care one way or the other. Although you can often just mix it as you need it. So if your using 250ml at a time, and there is 1L of concentrate to make 5L you can mix 50ml of concentrate with 200ml of water to make 250ml, and that reduces contamination, in that if it gets skunky you can toss the working solution and mix fresh. One key trick, get one of those multi-colour packs of electrical tape, use one colour for developer, another for bleach, another for fixer, another for rinse, if developer is green, and you going to pour in the developer and your reaching for a bottle that has a red band, you should be going ...
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  7. #57
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,030
    Images
    223

    C-41 processing for neophytes

    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    The best thing to do, determine how much you need, say you use a steel tank that holds 250ml, you buy a case of 24 250ml bottles, you need 4 per Litre, so 20 for 5L, you have 4 spares in case some get broken. Get a B&W print tray, and put the first empty bottle in it, and fill to the brim and add the cap, keep doing this until you run out of developer, pour from the tray back into the container and continue on, until all the developer is in bottles. Wash the bottles off and let them dry. Get some plastic wrap or aluminium foil, cut into 6" squares, put this over each cap and seal with electrical tape. Although glass bottles are air tight, they often use plastic lids that are not, so the plastic wrap is an extra air seal. Many developers can live in those bottles air tight for months. The seal is also an indicator to you, that the bottle has not been used. So you should have one or more sealed ones, and one unsealed one. When the developer in a bottle is all used up, you dump it, wash out the bottle, put it with the clean ones and unseal another. One note, a 250ml bottle filled to the brim is probably closer to 275ml, as the bottles are designed to be only partly filled.

    Bleach needs some air, so it can go in a single bottle. Fixer and final rinse don't really care one way or the other. Although you can often just mix it as you need it. So if your using 250ml at a time, and there is 1L of concentrate to make 5L you can mix 50ml of concentrate with 200ml of water to make 250ml, and that reduces contamination, in that if it gets skunky you can toss the working solution and mix fresh. One key trick, get one of those multi-colour packs of electrical tape, use one colour for developer, another for bleach, another for fixer, another for rinse, if developer is green, and you going to pour in the developer and your reaching for a bottle that has a red band, you should be going ...
    Haha yea I color label mine according to ilford bottle colors (Red Green blue).

    Thanks, though tray mixing would expose the developer to a lot of air during this process. But I think I've figured it out, looks like its B&H bottle ordering time again!


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  8. #58
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,931
    Images
    65

    OFFICIAL C41 process cycle and capacity

    I've posted this many many times. It is also on the Kodak web site in the instructions for small tank and rotary processing. This information was packaged with my C41 developer as the box stuffer.

    It should be part of the toolkit of every C41 processor.

    Happy New Year guys.

    PE
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails C41 process.jpg   C41 capacity.jpg  

  9. #59
    macandal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    150
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I've posted this many many times. It is also on the Kodak web site in the instructions for small tank and rotary processing. This information was packaged with my C41 developer as the box stuffer.

    It should be part of the toolkit of every C41 processor.

    Happy New Year guys.

    PE
    Thanks PE. Happy new year to you too.
    --Mario

  10. #60
    wogster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bruce Peninsula, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,266
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Haha yea I color label mine according to ilford bottle colors (Red Green blue).

    Thanks, though tray mixing would expose the developer to a lot of air during this process. But I think I've figured it out, looks like its B&H bottle ordering time again!


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    I didn't say to mix in the tray, your using the tray as you fill the bottles to make sure you don't lose any of the developer as you over pour the bottles.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin