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  1. #61
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    C-41 processing for neophytes

    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    I didn't say to mix in the tray, your using the tray as you fill the bottles to make sure you don't lose any of the developer as you over pour the bottles.
    OH haha!!! Thanks


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    Bleach needs some air, so it can go in a single bottle. Fixer and final rinse don't really care one way or the other. Although you can often just mix it as you need it.
    I agree about the bleach and the final rinse but would advise caution with the fixer. The fixer is mostly Ammonium Thiosulfate which will go bad eventually, especially when mixed into a working solution. Unless you plan on using the kit within a few months, I recommend a procedure where unused concentrate is kept in a tightly sealed bottle (or several of them, depending on use), and working solution is only mixed as needed and used within a few weeks.

    And yes, I have had fixer concentrate sulfur out on me in less than a year.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    I agree about the bleach and the final rinse but would advise caution with the fixer. The fixer is mostly Ammonium Thiosulfate which will go bad eventually, especially when mixed into a working solution. Unless you plan on using the kit within a few months, I recommend a procedure where unused concentrate is kept in a tightly sealed bottle (or several of them, depending on use), and working solution is only mixed as needed and used within a few weeks.

    And yes, I have had fixer concentrate sulfur out on me in less than a year.
    I usually keep fixer in concentrate and mix as needed. Generally though you want to buy in small enough quantities that you will use it up before it expires, this is tough when the smallest jug you can buy makes up 50 gallons, but for a 5L kit, you should be OK.
    Paul Schmidt
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    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    this is tough when the smallest jug you can buy makes up 50 gallons, but for a 5L kit, you should be OK.
    It was a 5l kit that failed on me because I didn't fill the opened container with inert gas after taking out fixer concentrate. A 5l kit develops 60-80 rolls of film, which is more than I shoot within a year.

    All I wanted to point out was that fixer is less stable than bleach and STAB and that one should be careful when storing it over a long time frame.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  5. #65
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    C-41 processing for neophytes

    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    It was a 5l kit that failed on me because I didn't fill the opened container with inert gas after taking out fixer concentrate. A 5l kit develops 60-80 rolls of film, which is more than I shoot within a year.

    All I wanted to point out was that fixer is less stable than bleach and STAB and that one should be careful when storing it over a long time frame.
    Thanks I'm ordering a bunch of smaller bottles when I get back from the Grand Canyon on the 15th


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #66
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    I did it. I finally did it. I developed my first roll of color.

    Now, how do I make enlargements?
    --Mario

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by macandal View Post
    I did it. I finally did it. I developed my first roll of color.

    Now, how do I make enlargements?
    Congratulation.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  8. #68
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    Okay, I may have spoken too soon. I developed my first roll of color. I got images. However, my negatives look brownish/redish. According to Henry Horenstein (Color Photography: A Working Manual) my "Negatives [are] too magenta, with density highest on edges near sprocket holes". My negatives are simply too magenta, nothing is really happening on the edges. He says that the probable causes are "1) Developer temperature too high; 2) Overagitation developer; 3) Development time too long". I can't really agree that any of this happened to me. I kept the temperature of my chemicals at around 100 F. I didn't overagitate. I kept my developing time according to the instructions on my kit. Hmmmm..?

    My kit says that the "color of the mask [is] brownish". The cause is that my "bleach and fixing time [was] too short". I also can't agree with this. Like I said, I followed the instructions to the letter. However, after consulting with the people at Rayko, we decided that perhaps it was a good idea to re-bleach and re-fix my negatives. They suggested that I do this at room temperature. However, room temperature at this time of year in San Francisco is about 50F. At 77F bleaching and fixing must be done for 6 and 7 minutes respectively. So, if I do it at room temp., at 50F, I was going to double the times. I was going to bleach and fix for 12 minutes. Their instructions are not the best either. For agitation, they say, "Agitate once every 30 seconds." So, every 30 seconds you turn it once and that's it? I didn't know what to do, so, every 30 seconds, I would agitate for 5 seconds (turning) and let it be until my next agitation cycle.

    Anyway, that's what happened and that's what I'm going to do. If anyone has any experience with the Rollei kit, please, help me out here. Also, if anyone has any suggestions, they're welcome. Thanks.
    --Mario

  9. #69
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    C-41 processing for neophytes

    Quote Originally Posted by macandal View Post
    Okay, I may have spoken too soon. I developed my first roll of color. I got images. However, my negatives look brownish/redish. According to Henry Horenstein (Color Photography: A Working Manual) my "Negatives [are] too magenta, with density highest on edges near sprocket holes". My negatives are simply too magenta, nothing is really happening on the edges. He says that the probable causes are "1) Developer temperature too high; 2) Overagitation developer; 3) Development time too long". I can't really agree that any of this happened to me. I kept the temperature of my chemicals at around 100 F. I didn't overagitate. I kept my developing time according to the instructions on my kit. Hmmmm..?

    My kit says that the "color of the mask [is] brownish". The cause is that my "bleach and fixing time [was] too short". I also can't agree with this. Like I said, I followed the instructions to the letter. However, after consulting with the people at Rayko, we decided that perhaps it was a good idea to re-bleach and re-fix my negatives. They suggested that I do this at room temperature. However, room temperature at this time of year in San Francisco is about 50F. At 77F bleaching and fixing must be done for 6 and 7 minutes respectively. So, if I do it at room temp., at 50F, I was going to double the times. I was going to bleach and fix for 12 minutes. Their instructions are not the best either. For agitation, they say, "Agitate once every 30 seconds." So, every 30 seconds you turn it once and that's it? I didn't know what to do, so, every 30 seconds, I would agitate for 5 seconds (turning) and let it be until my next agitation cycle.

    Anyway, that's what happened and that's what I'm going to do. If anyone has any experience with the Rollei kit, please, help me out here. Also, if anyone has any suggestions, they're welcome. Thanks.
    Did you also heat your blix to the 100 mark or leave that at 50f? That might be your problem? If your temp is that low in the house (you're crazy) then you might have had temperature drop in the developer bath. Heck even Holdong the tank for the proper development time during agitation would cause a severe drop in temp in such a cold environment....

    You might want to cook it at 105 next time so as the temp drops it won't be so low at the end?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  10. #70
    macandal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Did you also heat your blix to the 100 mark or leave that at 50f? That might be your problem? If your temp is that low in the house (you're crazy) then you might have had temperature drop in the developer bath. Heck even Holdong the tank for the proper development time during agitation would cause a severe drop in temp in such a cold environment....

    You might want to cook it at 105 next time so as the temp drops it won't be so low at the end?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    I didn't develop at home. I did it at Rayko (a facility here in San Francisco). I don't use blix, I use bleach and fixer separately. Neither was at 50F. They were both at 100F (I kept checking).
    --Mario



 

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