Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,895   Posts: 1,520,956   Online: 881
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    274

    Is there something wrong with this colour negative?

    I got a roll of Portra 400 (120) back from the local lab and one of the pictures has something weird going on (I think). I don't have a ton of experience with colour negatives so I don't know for sure what is happening. I am going to try and scan it to have a better look once I have flattened the film out overnight, but in the meantime has anyone seen this before? Pictures of the negative are below:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_3541.jpg 
Views:	151 
Size:	403.5 KB 
ID:	58970 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_3542.jpg 
Views:	142 
Size:	489.5 KB 
ID:	58971

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Winnipeg, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,301
    Double exposed?
    Bob

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    274
    definitely not double exposed, and that wouldn't explain why the dark region is out of sync with the image, especially where it extends to the very bottom of the film.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Winnipeg, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,301
    What camera are you using?
    Bob

  5. #5
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,916
    Images
    65
    They look ok to me!

    PE

  6. #6
    Worker 11811's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,620
    Just a thought...

    Are you talking about the little "notch" shaped details at the corners of the frames?

    A couple of my cameras do that. I presume it's a small defect in the aperture plate inside the camera.
    While they shouldn't have major defects, a company can't manufacture thousands or millions of cameras over a period of years to decades without having some variation.

    Even if they were manufactured perfectly every time (and they should be VERY close) over the years, wear and tear might have taken its toll.

    I look at it like the rifling in the barrel of a gun. No two are exactly alike.

    In fact, I can tell if a roll of 120 was shot in my Yashica or my Rolleiflex just by looking at the details in the corners of my negatives.
    The Yashica has an ever-so-sleight "dart" in the corner of the frame. Similar to yours, only smaller.

    I'm not saying all cameras have this. In most cameras that do have small defects in the aperture, you probably couldn't tell unless you used a magnifier.

    Regardless, it's probably worth checking your camera over. Look at the aperture plate, the lateral film guides, the pressure skid and the film trap area, in general. It might be simple as a piece of crud stuck in the corner that causes the film to buckle.

    I'm not sure this is the case with your camera but, for two minutes worth of cleaning and checking, you've got nothing to lose.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  7. #7
    wogster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bruce Peninsula, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,266
    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    Just a thought...

    Are you talking about the little "notch" shaped details at the corners of the frames?

    A couple of my cameras do that. I presume it's a small defect in the aperture plate inside the camera.
    While they shouldn't have major defects, a company can't manufacture thousands or millions of cameras over a period of years to decades without having some variation.

    Even if they were manufactured perfectly every time (and they should be VERY close) over the years, wear and tear might have taken its toll.

    I look at it like the rifling in the barrel of a gun. No two are exactly alike.

    In fact, I can tell if a roll of 120 was shot in my Yashica or my Rolleiflex just by looking at the details in the corners of my negatives.
    The Yashica has an ever-so-sleight "dart" in the corner of the frame. Similar to yours, only smaller.

    I'm not saying all cameras have this. In most cameras that do have small defects in the aperture, you probably couldn't tell unless you used a magnifier.

    Regardless, it's probably worth checking your camera over. Look at the aperture plate, the lateral film guides, the pressure skid and the film trap area, in general. It might be simple as a piece of crud stuck in the corner that causes the film to buckle.

    I'm not sure this is the case with your camera but, for two minutes worth of cleaning and checking, you've got nothing to lose.
    Actually many cameras have a notch like that, the idea is that each camera model, from the same manufacturer has a different notch, and years later you can tell which camera took the photo based on the notch. Of course this doesn't work if you have cameras from different manufacturers or two cameras that are the same model...
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    274
    Sorry I guess I should have been more clear - I thought the problem would be readily apparent (I was hoping it was something relatively common). It is an RB67 and I have taken hundreds of pictures with it and this is the first frame it has happened on. It is happening on only one frame of this roll. It is the frame with the trees (on the left in both pictures). You can see there is some kind of dark region on the emulsion that is roughly the shape of the frame, but not quite lined up with it. In the first picture you can see the dark region extends down to the edge of the film in the corner. In the second picture you can see the dark region does not extend up quite as far as the top of the image, and is clearly changing the density of the image when compared to the small strip at the top without the dark region behind it.

  9. #9
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,083
    Images
    12
    You mean how the foggy outer rectangle doesn't line up with the main image rectangle? What's happening (probably) is that you shot a very backlit or flarey scene, or overexposed a bit. Flare inside the camera does not necessarily come from the exit pupil of the lens and therefore it can pass through the film gate at a different angle, resulting in an offset and/or larger region of flare on the film compared to the focused image. Think of the sun being just out of frame, the lens will form an image of the sun on the inside side of the camera or somewhere in the lens barrel. That sun-image is maybe a thousand times brighter than the image you care about, which results in a mass of light bouncing around within the camera and onto your film, and you get veiling glare.

    When you scan this, you'll probably find that all the blacks are a bit washed out from the flare. Setting your blackpoint higher in the scan will clean it up a bit.

    To see a similar effect, shoot an image with very shallow DOF, which will mean you have a larger exit pupil of the lens. You'll therefore see that the edges of the image become blurry, i.e. the film-gate casts a penumbra instead of a clean-edged shadow.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    274
    thanks Polyglot - hopefully that is all that is wrong. The scene itself was actually rather dark and I was using F11 with a lens hood, but the sun did peak out from cloud right as I made the exposure so maybe it is flare.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin