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  1. #271

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    Quote Originally Posted by retro film View Post
    I recall reading about a guy who tried a trick to get Kodachrome film "developed"(in color). What he did was he would use a red filter and take a shot of the scene, then advance the film to the next slide, and shoot the same scene with a green filter, then advance to the next slide and shoot the same scene with a blue filter. Then he developed the film as black and white and scanned the film. And in photoshop he converted each BW slide into the color channel of the filter used and superimposed them and the end result was a color image of kodachrome. Though the cost was that it takes 3 slides to get one picture and objects cant be moving in the scene. But hey it worked.
    I'm not sure why he didn't just use a B&W film for that... Part of the wonder of Kodachrome was its unique color responses, which are totally lost using that method.

    Duncan

  2. #272
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    You can replicate Kodachrome very well using 3 color shots on B&W and then using a reversal C/M/Y development scheme. This has been often published. At the end, you bind all 3 together to get a finished slide. There are no tricks and no need to compound special formulas, you just make up what works. Leadly and Stegmeyer published this in the '40s.

    And Rudi, I am aware of these two types of endeavor but what I am saying that there is a LOT of talk here and across APUG but little action among those able to do it. They talk, but they don't do.

    PE

  3. #273
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by retro film View Post
    I recall reading about a guy who tried a trick to get Kodachrome film "developed"(in color). What he did was he would use a red filter and take a shot of the scene, then advance the film to the next slide, and shoot the same scene with a green filter, then advance to the next slide and shoot the same scene with a blue filter. Then he developed the film as black and white and scanned the film. And in photoshop he converted each BW slide into the color channel of the filter used and superimposed them and the end result was a color image of kodachrome. Though the cost was that it takes 3 slides to get one picture and objects cant be moving in the scene. But hey it worked.
    This has nothing to do with with Kodachrome film.

    What you refer to is colour photography by means of taking colour seperations in succession. This is a process going back to the beginning of colour photography and was a important process back then. Look for the work of Adolf Miethe.

  4. #274
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    The Library of Congress' website is down until Monday, it seems, but if you Google "LOC color photos of Russia" you'll find several links to color photographs of Russia made in the late 1800's using a tri-color process. Digital technology (which can be useful, after all) allowed the Library to scan all three single-color images then very accurately combine the three layers. (I read all this long ago, so I hope I'm remembering correctly.) It's wonderful to see a world that we normally only see in b/w images as being as fully of color as our own.

  5. #275
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    This has nothing to do with with Kodachrome film.

    What you refer to is colour photography by means of taking colour seperations in succession. This is a process going back to the beginning of colour photography and was a important process back then. Look for the work of Adolf Miethe.
    That's what I was thinking, but I wonder, might the color filter layers in the film influence the result in some way?
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  6. #276
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    Color filters can influence the quality of the result. The details are very complex and would require an hour or so of typing and pasting graphs and charts to show the details.

    PE

  7. #277
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    Yes, I was just thinking that maybe the filtration layers would create a different look in the end product compared to a color separation using regular B&W film, and that maybe that would preserve a "Kodachrome look".
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  8. #278
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    You can replicate Kodachrome very well using 3 color shots on B&W and then using a reversal C/M/Y development scheme. This has been often published. At the end, you bind all 3 together to get a finished slide. There are no tricks and no need to compound special formulas, you just make up what works. Leadly and Stegmeyer published this in the '40s.
    None of this will get the Shuttle film rolls developed. There is no need (in my humble opinion) to bring back Kodachrome film, but I would find it quite interesting to bring those few exciting rolls of film to life that have already been exposed. If some wealthy folks want to get some additional Kodachrome developed and thereby help fund the whole process, more power to them I'd say.

    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    And Rudi, I am aware of these two types of endeavor but what I am saying that there is a LOT of talk here and across APUG but little action among those able to do it. They talk, but they don't do.
    Feel free to add me to the list of those who talk more than they do, and I shall save you from my usual "I have a family and a job and rah rah rah". The question remains whether "developing Kodachrome" can be a job description, i.e. whether it would pay the bills for one or two years. If yes, and Stephen still holds the key to the answer, then this could be a great opportunity to get some of us talkers going. If this turns into a "two rolls per quarter, and half of the customers won't pay, because their ten year old slides came out a bit fogged" operation, then ok, ditch it.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  9. #279
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    The "ditch it" option is the best.

    PE

  10. #280
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