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  1. #111

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    Thanks. So percentually really does not exists. Re-reading my statement I see I had an easy substitute in "comparatively". :-)
    It exists now, you've just invented it. :-D But I won't turn this thread into an English lesson; I make a poor teacher and we understand your meaning anyway. :-D

    Cheers,
    kevs
    testing...

  2. #112
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    With a Hasselblad or any MF camera with changeable backs, you only need one camera.

    With a Pacemaker Speed or Crown Graphic, you only need one camera and sets of film holders with different films.

    If you use digital you will miss the truly great shots because you will be too busy chimpin' to watch what is going on.
    That is true, although if you want to take a lot of shots, most 120 cameras don't get a lot of images per roll, so you would need a lot of backs, and even 30 years ago, the backs cost more then many 35mm camera bodies. I would hate to see a guy try to do a wedding today with a Speed Graphic when most people expect to have a couple of million frames to look through on your iPad after the reception.... Doesn't mean you can't use an SG for some shots, there is no better tool for that poster sized print of the bride and groom to go in their new home.... Like I said though, a good photographer has more then one tool (camera), and knows how to use all of them. The key isn't the tool, it's using the tools to get what you want. With the minimum of time taken. Say you get $500 to do a wedding, you spend 40 hours on the computer to get a bunch of digital images to look like they were shot on film, your materials cost is $75, your depreciation on your camera is $10, you spent 5 hours on a Saturday doing the shoot. Congratulations you made $9.22/hr....

    Shoot the same thing on film, you spent $150 on film and processing, your time is 5 hours plus the hour to the lab and back, you made $58.33 an hour, this is why some wedding photographers are going back to film, plain and simple.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  3. #113

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    How many weddings are now shot on Phones?

    I wish we had even Instamatic photos of our wedding, as we had no pictures taken at all.

    The arguing continues but as long as there is film I will use it and enjoy it. And the naysayers can't stop me.
    - Bill Lynch

  4. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by wblynch View Post
    How many weddings are now shot on Phones?

    I wish we had even Instamatic photos of our wedding, as we had no pictures taken at all.

    The arguing continues but as long as there is film I will use it and enjoy it. And the naysayers can't stop me.
    Probably quite a few, not everyone can afford hundreds or thousands of dollars for photos that will sit in a drawer, to be hauled out only for special occasions. My own was shot mostly on the 35mm disposables we put out on tables.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  5. #115

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    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    My own was shot mostly on the 35mm disposables we put out on tables.
    No lie, the best pictures we got of both daughter's weddings were from the disposable film cameras. And all went onto CD's from the processor for digital distribution needs.
    - Bill Lynch

  6. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    That is true, although if you want to take a lot of shots, most 120 cameras don't get a lot of images per roll, so you would need a lot of backs, and even 30 years ago, the backs cost more then many 35mm camera bodies. I would hate to see a guy try to do a wedding today with a Speed Graphic when most people expect to have a couple of million frames to look through on your iPad after the reception.... Doesn't mean you can't use an SG for some shots, there is no better tool for that poster sized print of the bride and groom to go in their new home.... Like I said though, a good photographer has more then one tool (camera), and knows how to use all of them. The key isn't the tool, it's using the tools to get what you want. With the minimum of time taken. Say you get $500 to do a wedding, you spend 40 hours on the computer to get a bunch of digital images to look like they were shot on film, your materials cost is $75, your depreciation on your camera is $10, you spent 5 hours on a Saturday doing the shoot. Congratulations you made $9.22/hr....

    Shoot the same thing on film, you spent $150 on film and processing, your time is 5 hours plus the hour to the lab and back, you made $58.33 an hour, this is why some wedding photographers are going back to film, plain and simple.
    Truly don't need a zillion shots to do a good job. An educated buyer will understand that. Modern albums typically use 60-100 shots.

    The last wedding I shot, was done on 9-rolls of 35mm. That was considerably more shots than really needed.

    Probably would have had plenty with 9-10 rolls on my RB. I've got three backs which would have easily covered the rushes and weddings normally are hurry then wait affairs, there would be plenty of time to reload.

    Of course I'd charge more than $500.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by wblynch View Post
    No lie, the best pictures we got of both daughter's weddings were from the disposable film cameras. And all went onto CD's from the processor for digital distribution needs.
    Same here. My daughter paid $5,000 for a professional wedding photographer. Mom and I handed out 50 Kodak disposable cameras that costs us a tad over $200 (cheapest investment of the entire wedding.) When everything was all said and done the shots from the Kodak cameras were the ones with the best results. The professional photographer obviously had a nice set of posed portraits the bride and groom, and of various members of the wedding party. But the candids were a bust. Those little disposables are great cameras. Can't find the Kodak ones anymore but I can still get the Fuji ones. Am going to hand out another batch for this upcoming Xmas.

  8. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I do not need to take thousands of photographs to capture a wedding. I make each photograph count. Hasselblad back are much cheaper now, I generally pay about $100US per back, and I discovered that they are even reusable!
    My main point is though, that of photographer time. You take the images, drop it at the lab, and let the lab do the processing and proof prints. Then pick them up on the way to visit the family, with paper prints to go through, they pick the ones they like, and you drop the order back at the lab. Your time investment is minimal, the time you spent at the shoot and going to the lab. I guess, if your old school and use your digital the way a film guy uses film, you could do similar, drop the card at the lab for printing, and then pick up prints for the meeting. A lot of digital guys, who didn't come from a film background, end up shooting 2,000 frames, and if you give the family that kind of choice, it will take weeks to decide on the 60 for the package. That means the photographer has to cut it from 2,000 to 120 or so, and that's going to take hours. Hours they could spend on getting more gigs.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  9. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    What is this "card" of which you speak? The 18% gray [grey] card? Business card? Ace of Spades?
    Tarot card

  10. #120

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    What is this "card" of which you speak? The 18% gray [grey] card? Business card? Ace of Spades?
    A Red Card for blabbering on about digital...



 

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