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  1. #21
    GRHazelton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvy View Post
    Backblaze is affordable for unlimited backups. I hope to never have to use it, but I still pull some files down periodically to make sure all is well. Still, if you're backing up corrupt files, it's a moot point. Sounds like something else is going on.


    I had to use Backblaze's restore when two hard drives in a Raid I array failed within minutes of each other. GRRRRRRR. The Backblaze upload wasn't quite complete, so I lost some files despite the hard drive manufacturer's "help" with a routine which did no good. These particular drives failed for alot of folks and very few users were able to recover their files. A restore from Backblaze takes quite a while, (read several days!) but it did work. About the best $50 per year I ever spent.

    I now have a new machine with 2 1T WD drives designed for RAID usage, the array is backed up to 1.5T drives in drawers periodically, and Backblaze is rarely more than a few days behind. I have also gotten an UPS, something I should have done years ago.

    Still, when I consider the negatives I shot 50 years ago and those my father shot in the '30s, all still in excellent condition...I'd never throw them away, as some friends apparently have. They get their pix scanned to a CD and think that permanence is assured...NOT!

  2. #22

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    Deleted pictures on a storage card can be recovered. Once overwritten they are gone for good but you might be surprised what you can pull off those cards.

    Even if the card was 'formatted' in the camera, they could still be there.

    Worth a try...
    - Bill Lynch

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianmquinn View Post
    I am a film and digital shooter. I have EVERY shot I have ever taken on film going back 40 years. I have a good file system and can find ANY negative or slide within a minute or two.

    I am also a tech savy person and have been building my own home computers since the late 1970s. That was BEFORE the PC existed. I also began programing at that time.

    I currently own a Pentax K5 DSLR but also own and continue to use about a dozen film cameras. My favorites are the Pentax K2 and MX, PZ-1P and MZ-S, and finally 645. I still bring out the old Kodaks, AGFAs and Yashicas on occasion.

    I back up my computer every other day with a rolling backup and I keep several copies of by back up on more then one hard drive. So it would be IMPOSSIBLE to lose anything. WRONG!

    With my digital files I often copy them to my computer at the end of the day. Once a month or so catalog, tag etc the photos and file them in a different archive folder on the hard drive. Well last time I did so all of the files for the 6 week period were corrupt. I could see the image name on the hard drive and they files were the correct size BUT if I tried to open them I go an error and no image.

    Well I have SIX copes of these folders backed up on TWO external Hard Drives. One must be good. ALL are corrupt. I lost over 6 weeks of shots. Many were valuable and cannot be replaced.

    FILM RULES!!!!
    Practise proper backup technique with ALL important data. Using multiple backups is good, but not to identical media type in the same physical storage location. Same reason RAID1 is not a backup, mess it up on one, it happens to both. Faulty controller? Say good bye to both.

    In any case, recovery software often helps, you can rebuild corrupt master file tables, and also data recovery software, chances with good software is usually pretty good, as it's usually not a hardware issue (faulty read/write heads, bad sectors, etc) esp when happened to both.

    I'd recommend backing up to another place, if you live in a country with lots of bandwidth and large data allowances, use some kind of online dropbox, or buy some web hosting and ftp it there, optical media is a good choice too (when you use a quality burner, which is pretty much Pioneer brand by a long margin, along with quality discs, which would be Taiyo Yuden, or rebranded Taiyo Yudens, or the Inorganic Dye Verbatims (non-LTH ones, dont get organic dye Verbatims), stay away from "noname"/low end tier discs such as Sony, TDK, etc).

    If shooting digital, and it's paid... just write off the cost of the memory card, don't reuse it, and archive it somewhere safe, that's indexed and filed.. or at least buy slower speed memory cards and store it on there.
    Last edited by Athiril; 11-08-2012 at 04:29 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #24

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    My intent in opening this post was not to ask for advice on file recovery. I go a lot however; posted here and via PM. Thanks to everyone that tried to help.

    My main post is that anyone that has shot film has an instant archive in the envelope when their photos arrive. When my grandparents died all of their photos and negative were there and viewable by eye. They were all saved. With digital even when you know what you are doing and take care, spend dollars and hours of effort you can still lose a lot or even everything.

    Much of the advice posted here I already knew about and had tried. None worked for me. All of the information posted here may help others not as experienced as me however. So if you have advice give it. Especially if it can help with film archive storage and organization.

    I realize that this is APUG. However the first thing photo thing I ever did on my computer was to start to enter information on my negative and slide collection. When the information was in a digital format searching key words, date and such was so much easier.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by brianmquinn View Post
    <snip>

    My main post is that anyone that has shot film has an instant archive in the envelope when their photos arrive. When my grandparents died all of their photos and negative were there and viewable by eye. They were all saved. With digital even when you know what you are doing and take care, spend dollars and hours of effort you can still lose a lot or even everything.

    <snip>
    It only takes one match / hard drive crash / electrical fault/ flood / lightning strike / earthquake to wipe out any archive, physical or digital. The only invulnerable data is that of which multiple copies are stored off-site away from the originals. And don't forget the role of the vinegar syndrome, or just plain carelessness. Hmmm, better get scanning then...

    Cheers,
    kevs
    testing...

  6. #26

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    Kevs you are Correct.
    I said earlier in the post 95% of my film images have been scanned and I do have off site storage. Still I feel that only I know or care about my digital files. When I go nobody will search my old computer for images. However nobody will toss my eye viewable images (prints, negatives and slides) without thinking twice.

    That is not to say they will not be tossed in the trash; only that they will think twice before doing so.

  7. #27
    Brian C. Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevs View Post
    It only takes one match / hard drive crash / electrical fault/ flood / lightning strike / earthquake to wipe out any archive, physical or digital. The only invulnerable data is that of which multiple copies are stored off-site away from the originals. And don't forget the role of the vinegar syndrome, or just plain carelessness. Hmmm, better get scanning then...

    Cheers,
    kevs
    Wired: In Billions of Years, Aliens Will Find These Photos in a Dead Satellite

    Photographs etched onto a silicon wafer, which is attached to a satellite. It will be up there until someone comes along and cleans up all of that space junk, at least.

  8. #28

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    Aliens will find the satellite and scratch their heads upon viewing their discovery.

    Then they will eat it.
    - Bill Lynch

  9. #29

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    Nah, it will be found by some joy riding alien teens who wwill then tag the satellite with cosmic green spray paint thus eliminating us from memory.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevs View Post
    It only takes one match / hard drive crash / electrical fault/ flood / lightning strike / earthquake to wipe out any archive, physical or digital. The only invulnerable data is that of which multiple copies are stored off-site away from the originals. And don't forget the role of the vinegar syndrome, or just plain carelessness. Hmmm, better get scanning then...

    Cheers,
    kevs
    You know that no matter how many archives you have in how many places, nothing guards against obsolescence. When I moved a few months ago, I tossed the last of my 5¼" floppies. I have not seen a working 5¼" floppy drive in about a decade, no longer had a way to read them, so I tossed them. Even if you find a CD in 100 years that would be still readable, there is no guarantee that you will be able to find a CD drive to read it, and even if you find a drive, there is no guarantee that a computer will still have an IDE interface on it, so you could use that drive. Long term on-line storage, depends on someone paying to maintain the account, my daughter might want to continue my account when I am gone, but will her children, especially if I am gone before they are born. One thing that will still exist is the thousands of B&W negatives that I have carefully stored over the years, I have a negative that was taken of my grandparents when my grandmother was young, sometime in the 1940's according to my mother. You know I can still pull a perfect print off that negative. I have a print of my grandfather on my dad's side, that was taken sometime during WWI it's a little faded, but still perfectly visible. I have a feeling that the current period in time will be considered a lost decade, because there will be so little photographic evidence of it.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

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