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  1. #31

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    "I have a feeling that the current period in time will be considered a lost decade, because there will be so little photographic evidence of it."
    I totally agree. I know a lot of kids that grew up digital and do not own a single image unless it is posted with their cell phone to facebook.


    I have an old “shoe box” of my Grandfathers old medium and large format negative that go back 80 years. I have made hundreds of good prints from these to give to relatives that requested them. I give out a set of prints when cousin or nephew etc has their first child. The parents are usually overjoyed when they receive a nice set of print of the baby’s Great Grand Parents when they were young and just starting a family. Often they say their baby look just like its grandfather when he was a baby. Unlike digital it took no effort for these negatives to pass from one generation to the next.

  2. #32
    Brian C. Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    I have a feeling that the current period in time will be considered a lost decade, because there will be so little photographic evidence of it.
    +1. However, I think that it's going to be more than a single decade. What will happen is that there will be the film archive, and then there will essentially be nothing else. Like that silicone disc sent into space, the image won't exist without actually being an image. The oldest images are made with pigment on a cave wall, down deep, protected from the elements. But with digital, it barely exists, just as much as a spark exists.

    The only reliable evidence will come from stuff like Vivian Maier and people like her, wandering out and photographing. But of course the next problem comes with actually storing the negatives. What then? That's always a problem. Such is life.

  3. #33

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    I have a fairly similar history to the OP. My primary camera is a fairly ancient Pentax 645, but I use a lot of other film cameras (mostly MF) too. I also use a Nikon D-200 and a Canon G-12 for a fairly large volume of digital work. I scan my film so that I can index and print the negatives easily. I back up to DVDs. I have had some disasters in the past. I can usually recover (very slowly) from the DVD backups, but not always. Lately I installed a RAID 4 array which gives me some (but not total) peace of mind. One worry is losing my Lightroom index, which is backed up but not on the RAID drive. Another worry is the ever changing digital format fashions - will I be able to read the DVDs or use the RAID drive in the future? It's nice to have negatives.

  4. #34
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    I have a feeling that the current period in time will be considered a lost decade, because there will be so little photographic evidence of it.
    The decayed decade.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  5. #35

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    I have an old water-proof, air-proof, explosion-proof ammunition box from my military days that will protect anything inside from humidity, flood, hurricane, earthquake and perhaps even fire.

    I have stuff that's been in there 35 years that is still like new and unfaded. I should look for more. Don't know if I could find any.
    - Bill Lynch

  6. #36

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    Your mention of ammunition boxes made me laugh. Here is a story from the pre-911 days. My friends and I are real outdoors men. We love to hike, canoe and camp everywhere from Alaska to Florida. Decades ago we discovered ammunition boxes at the army surplus stores. They were PERFCECT for camera gear in rough wet spaces; like caves or canoes. One time we were passing the border between Canada and the USA in a beat up old van and we were not looking so great after days in the woods. Well the border patrol agent just happened to see a pile of ammunition boxes in the back of the van. You get the rest of the story. At least back then we did not get searched up the ....

  7. #37
    MattKing's Avatar
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    One big advantage of a film archive vs. an electronic archive is that generally you can tell if a film archive is corrupted by just looking at it (or sometimes smelling it).
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #38
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth View Post
    I have a fairly similar history to the OP. My primary camera is a fairly ancient Pentax 645, but I use a lot of other film cameras (mostly MF) too. I also use a Nikon D-200 and a Canon G-12 for a fairly large volume of digital work. I scan my film so that I can index and print the negatives easily. I back up to DVDs. I have had some disasters in the past. I can usually recover (very slowly) from the DVD backups, but not always. Lately I installed a RAID 4 array which gives me some (but not total) peace of mind. One worry is losing my Lightroom index, which is backed up but not on the RAID drive. Another worry is the ever changing digital format fashions - will I be able to read the DVDs or use the RAID drive in the future? It's nice to have negatives.
    Your Lightroom index is the least worrying thing as it can be recreated by the archived information. Actually if you lose your index you will be forced to get all your archives and that will be a healthy check of the availability of all the information.

    I certainly agree with the OP that film is much easier to archive than digital images. We should not forget, though, how many films have been lost in the past due to poor quality PVC film sleeves, or bad processing (bad washing for instance), or lost in the mail while shipped. The few rolls of Kodachrome I shot were a torture as I had to wait weeks to have them back. Never more.

    Films still are at risk if people keeps them in the basement, or doesn't check health from time to time. Keep them high and dry!

    Regarding backups, like athiril I do mistrust RAID solutions. There is an entire additional level of failure (RAID controller, that's supposing it is a hardware RAID solution) and when it fails it brings down the entire barn. I personally have a simple backup strategy: One relatively new disk inside the PC; one relatively new external disk as backup; most of what I do I send to stock agencies so I consider them by "external" backup.

    Hard drives with important information are to be treated like the "distribution belt" of your engine (what's in English? The things that brings motion from the piston shaft to the cam shaft). It will fail and it will be tragic. Substitution must be planned before failure. The "old" disks can be used for less important information (such as the operating system. When the disk fails you know it immediately and you restore your system backup to a new disk without crying).
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  9. #39
    lxdude's Avatar
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    "distribution belt"

    In the US that's usually called the timing belt. Timing because it maintains the timing of the camshaft to the crankshaft, though naturally its primary purpose is to drive the camshaft. It is sometimes called the camshaft drive belt.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  10. #40
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    "distribution belt"

    In the US that's usually called the timing belt. Timing because it maintains the timing of the camshaft to the crankshaft, though naturally its primary purpose is to drive the camshaft. It is sometimes called the camshaft drive belt.
    Or maybe it's because it's used to drive the distributor... and when we adjust the points, it is called adjusting the timing.

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