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  1. #1

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    Anything Wrong with this C-41 Film Processing?

    I tested my C-41 chemical with an unknown roll of film from a camera I purchased a while ago. I did not shoot the film, so I do not know much about it. It is a Kodak max.

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    The film looks over-exposed. It looks too green. The CN-41 chemicals are old (open bottle concentrate) and I was thinking of dumping the open bottles and restart from sealed bottles. I do not know if the chemicals are bad, or just the over-exposed negative.

    The film was scanned with Minolta Elite 5400 film scanner.
    A photo amateur
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  2. #2

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    There is very definitely a colour shift somewhere along the line. It may be the film is old and where it was kept in the camera was not the best environment. Before dumping the chemicals it may be worth doing a short test film to check if the results are the same.

  3. #3

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    You meant a test with a good film? That is better done with a roll of bulk film....
    A photo amateur
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  4. #4

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    How can you make a valid test with film of unknown heritage? You don't know if the film was properly exposed or stored properly among other variables!
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  5. #5
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    RedSun I doubt it's over exposed, C41 films are very tolerant of extra exposure.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #6

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    To test the chemicals you only need to use six inches of film. Shoot a few exposures on fresh film and cut the exposed footage directly from the camera, in a darkroom or changing-bag.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinP View Post
    To test the chemicals you only need to use six inches of film. Shoot a few exposures on fresh film and cut the exposed footage directly from the camera, in a darkroom or changing-bag.
    That is something I can do.
    A photo amateur
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  8. #8
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    The best test is to shoot a MacBeth target, or the color target found bound into an old color Darkroom Dataguide. I shoot whole rolls at a time, and then clip a few inches onto the eld of a reel with each fresh mix of c-41 to spot bad chems or mixing errors.
    my real name, imagine that.



 

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