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  1. #61

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    That's part of the problem ... things which are officially nontoxic can become sensitizers which are
    potentially very serious, even leading to potentially fatal anaphylactic shock. I see this esp with
    people who work with epoxy and polyester resins (if they actually outlive the carcinogens, that is!).
    The other big problem is that all these things are hypothetically tested EPA or FDA or whatever
    individually, and obviously not in all the jillions of ways they can potentially interact. So downwind
    from our refineries in this area the same cities are getting residential water from rivers flowing thru
    pesticide-laden farmlands, and the cumulative effect per cancer rates is significantly in excess of
    what the isolated ingredient hazard would seem to be. Plain lung irritation can be another issue. I
    always hate to color print if there are common colds going around. No matter how careful I am,
    I'm just way more susceptible if my lungs are a little irritated, whether from a bit of color bleach,
    or from some neighbor illegally burning salvaged lumber in their fireplace. I must be doing something
    right, cause I haven't taken a sick day from work in over three years, though I've had a few minor
    colds. (will keep my fingers crossed)

  2. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    Hope you recovered from your dermatitis. Anyway, it's a good to avoid toxic people and toxic chemicals.
    I just never let things develop past a certain point anymore.

    From age 13 up through my late 30's I often had my bare hands in various chemistry. Even after 20 years or so my cuticles never recovered.

  3. #63
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    What else can cause severe allergies?

    Antistat rags in the dryer, deodorants, brighteners and scents in laundry detergents, latex gloves, and common household molds and fungi. Of course there is dust mite dust, skin flakes and the grand total for common dermatological tests number 60. And this is just for things around the house!

    I would not worry about most of the photographic chemicals when faced with hundreds of irritants.

    Oh, and the photo companies eliminated formalin from coatings and process solutions so we are only exposed to it wen we buy a new shirt or new furniture. Formalin is used in glues, paints and sizing materials that give us permanent press shirts.

    PE

  4. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    What else can cause severe allergies?

    Antistat rags in the dryer, deodorants, brighteners and scents in laundry detergents, latex gloves, and common household molds and fungi. Of course there is dust mite dust, skin flakes and the grand total for common dermatological tests number 60. And this is just for things around the house!

    I would not worry about most of the photographic chemicals when faced with hundreds of irritants.

    Oh, and the photo companies eliminated formalin from coatings and process solutions so we are only exposed to it wen we buy a new shirt or new furniture. Formalin is used in glues, paints and sizing materials that give us permanent press shirts.

    PE
    its kind of funny, isn't it ron ?

    people are very worried about photochemistry,
    its toxicity, its potential harm, its allergic affect
    all sorts of troubles it may cause ...
    but many of potentially harmful things have
    been removed from the ingredients ...
    and regular "household" or widely used products
    like detergents, clothing, dryer sheets, nail polish even antibiotics
    have things in them that used to cause "trouble" when part of the photographic landscape.

    i guess like everything, moderation is the key ?

  5. #65

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    PE, I think my problem was made much worse when I sepia toned about thirty 16x20 prints when I worked for the AF back in the early 90's. I couldn't wear gloves because the prints were so slippery. It was the old rotten egg stuff. It took a very long time and I did it on my own time in my own back yard. My hands swelled to what seemed like twice their size and they were numb for days. After that they cracked and bled for awhile. My cuticles have never been the same.

    BTW, these were copies of historic photos and publications to display at the local HQ. I used 4x5 with various films and processing techniques to produce decent quality reproductions. Many of these would have been a challenge for some people to make decent copies of. What pisses me of to this day is how they drooled over the color snapshots done by a hack showing the (then) current locations of the copied images. He just pointed and clicked on medium format color and they paid a local lab for prints. The reaction to the B&W was, "meh". They didn't have a clue regarding skill level of either task nor the time and effort nor the pain-in-the-neck... or hands.

    We all have similar stories though.

    Anyway, I do think the extended time in sepia toner is what caused most of the damage to my hands.

  6. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by Old-N-Feeble View Post
    PE, I think my problem was made much worse when I sepia toned about thirty 16x20 prints when I worked for the AF back in the early 90's. I couldn't wear gloves because the prints were so slippery. It was the old rotten egg stuff. It took a very long time and I did it on my own time in my own back yard. My hands swelled to what seemed like twice their size and they were numb for days. After that they cracked and bled for awhile. My cuticles have never been the same.
    Sodium sulfide solutions are very caustic almost as alkaline as sodium hydroxide. You may have suffered chemical burns which would account for the cracking and bleeding.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by EASmithV View Post
    How about bw developers? Are they still skin sensitizers? If so, much less?
    Both paraphenylenediamine and orthophenylenediamine are powerful sensitizers and can cause severe blistering in sensitive individuals besides cross sensitizing people to metol and the color developing agents. This is why I try to discourage people from using some of the older fine grain developers that contain these chamicals or their salts. These developers really have no place considering the fine grain of today's emulsions.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  8. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinP View Post
    Wouldn't that leave barrier-cream residue on everything touched?
    No, after applying the cream you wash off any excess. The cream bonds with the skin and protects for two hours IIRC after which time it should be reapplied. BTW, Photographer's Formulary sells the cream and so do many pharmacies.

    Rubber gloves are not completely impervious to some chamicals. Awhile ago a young researcher using methylmercury died a very slow and unpleasant death from a single drop of this chemicals on her rubber glove. She thought she was protected and did not immediately remove the contaiminated glove.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old-N-Feeble View Post
    I'm alergic to my ex-wife... and she gave me dermatitis somewhere. I won't touch the stuff anymore. That reaction was quite caustic... to my brain, I mean.
    I would have posted something similar, but recently I got spanked by one of the distaff APUG members.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #70
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    Well, the trick in some of these posts is to find a good wife that is worth hanging on to! I was lucky or smart!

    Now for chemistry, I have seen people using barrier creams who have bad dermatitis in spots. It is difficult to say what causes this or what is the problem, but they are NOT as good as gloves.

    As for household chemicals, IDK, I know that the photo industry is ahead of them.

    PE

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