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Thread: Distilled water

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    Distilled water

    This may sound like a stupid tip. However here goes.

    The water supply where I live has quite a high lime content so will leave marks on any film that I process if I am not careful. I do have access to a regular supply of 'distilled water' but from an unusual source - namely the condensing clothes tumble drier. This water is condensed out of the drying clothes and is collected in a storage container fitted to the drier. When full it holds about 6-7 pints. Up until now has been simply poured away but last night I saved some and checked it for content of any particles, hairs fibres etc and then filtered it and - nothing. I processed a B&W film this morning and did a final rinse in the saved water and it dried perfectly with virtually no marks at all.

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    markbarendt's Avatar
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    That's handy.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

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    I do the same thing with the tumble dryer. However I haven't been filtering the water and, on the last film processing run, there were a few particles in the water so I didn't use it. What do you use to filter the water ?

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    A coffee filter works nice. Also, you can cut the curved upper part of a ~2 liter PET bottle to use as a funnel. I've used this for filtering since I was in high-school and I didn't have access to "proper" chemical equipment for my experiments.
    Hope that helps.

    Also, does anyone have experience with those home filters (with reverse osmosis, carbon, silver,etc stages)? My aunt has one and uses it for drinking water. The conductivity is really low, but I was wondering if anyone tried using that water for darkroom work.

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    chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
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    The chances of that water being full of lint and dust is very high. Distilled water costs less than $1 a gallon at the grocery store or Walmart; it is not worth the risk to save so little money.
    Chris Crawford
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    Quote Originally Posted by BMbikerider View Post
    This may sound like a stupid tip. However here goes.

    The water supply where I live has quite a high lime content so will leave marks on any film that I process if I am not careful. I do have access to a regular supply of 'distilled water' but from an unusual source - namely the condensing clothes tumble drier. This water is condensed out of the drying clothes and is collected in a storage container fitted to the drier. When full it holds about 6-7 pints. Up until now has been simply poured away but last night I saved some and checked it for content of any particles, hairs fibres etc and then filtered it and - nothing. I processed a B&W film this morning and did a final rinse in the saved water and it dried perfectly with virtually no marks at all.
    Just curious, why is the moisture condensate collected by these dryers rather than just vented outside?
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iulian View Post
    .....
    Also, does anyone have experience with those home filters (with reverse osmosis, carbon, silver,etc stages)? My aunt has one and uses it for drinking water. The conductivity is really low, but I was wondering if anyone tried using that water for darkroom work.
    I got a distiller and I am using single pass distilled water in the darkroom.
    Reverse osmosis does not provide clean enough water.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chriscrawfordphoto View Post
    ..Distilled water costs less than $1 a gallon at the grocery store or Walmart...
    This is reverse osmosis product, a filtered water.
    Boiled distilled water is completely different story, it takes lots of time and energy for the vapors to pass thru a serpent turbine, then the inorganic solvents are filtered thru charcoal.
    With consumer grade distiller 600W, it takes around 5 hours to distill 1 gallon.
    If You got a military grade distiller, like the ones used in submarines, You might do it in less time but it wont cost less.
    There is no chance in hell 1 gallon distilled water to cost 1$ unless You live on Mars or Jupiter

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    Quote Originally Posted by chriscrawfordphoto View Post
    The chances of that water being full of lint and dust is very high. Distilled water costs less than $1 a gallon at the grocery store or Walmart; it is not worth the risk to save so little money.
    Remember the OP is in the U.K. I have certainly never seen distilled water here at the equivalent of $1(about 62p) a gallon or anything even near that very cheap price

    pentaxuser

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    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by georg16nik View Post
    I got a distiller and I am using single pass distilled water in the darkroom.
    Reverse osmosis does not provide clean enough water.
    I don't understand this statement, I would think it is too clean.

    I use a reverse osmosis unit for drinking water, it's part of the water wall for my darkroom. But since it only has a 2 1/2 gallon tank, I only use it for mixing stock chems. I also use for the final rinse (with a bit of Photo-Flo). I use tap water through a single filter for running water in the sink, washing film and prints.

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