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  1. #21
    tsiklonaut's Avatar
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    They came out allright.


    My first 6-bath E6 development by tsiklonaut, on Flickr

    I put two opposite films into the same tank (my tank thakes 2 films at the time) to be sure I have no color bias:

    Left is Kodak Aerochrome color infrared film (red dominated)
    Right is Fuji Veliva 50 shot nocturnally long exposures (blue dominated)

    One frame is missing on Velvia since my good old Pentax failed to lock into Bulb-mode for that shot - I'm using the lock in front of the camera to lock it witha a sharp object, I happened to use my motoscooter's key which didn't fit into the hole quite well

    Nocturnal Velvia is a little under exposured for my liking, although I precisely followed the reprocity error margins specified by Fuji on long exposures, maybe I should have used more First Developer time but then again then would be the Aerochrome overexposed. Next time I'll rate Veliva to around ASA32 on nocturnal action.

  2. #22

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    Re: Fuji Hunt Chrome 6X for home tank processing?

    Nice!
    I've got a set of the Fuji chemicals in their way from Germany. Can't wait to give them a go (my last Kodak e6 kit is well past is due by date).
    Quick question, with the Kodak kits, first dev time was 7.30 for Velvia. What first dev times did you use?

    Sent from my GT-P3110 using Tapatalk HD

  3. #23
    tsiklonaut's Avatar
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    Fuji manual states with the DIY-style simple tank it's between 6 to 7 minutes and YOU must decide the best method/time judging from results and after around 2/3 of chemical yield has been used (exhausted, i.e. 5L of solution makes 44 rolls, rolls 1-30 you make with "normal" times) you need to add 30 seconds for the FD (depending on what times you decide on FD, rolls 31-44). For all rotary processors FD was only 6 minutes (not between 6-7 as with simple tank). So from this logic and having the fresh cemistry in the process I opted to exactly 6 minutes of FD.

    Next time I'll probably make 6 min 15 sec or so, but only if I have all V50 rolls in the tank - as you can see Kodak Aerochrome was spot-on exposure with 6 min FD. OR shoot the V50 at ASA32 or so - many people claim to have good results like that.

    I'd like to test which is better: shooting V50 at ASA32 and develop FD 6' OR shoot film at nominal ASA50 and process it in FD 6'15''-6'30'. Would be good to know which method provides better tonality on Velvia 50

    I make 500ml solutions into my small tank, so the rolls 1-3 is with normal FD times, 4th roll is longer. Well actually I'm lazy enough so I put two films into 500ml tank, rolls 1&2 I make normal, rolls 3&4 I make with +25 sec of FD. Then the FD and CD are exhausted and I make new solutions. Thus I plan to use the kit for around 40 rolls (4 rolls go into "loss", but with a small tank and many processes - only 2 films per process - I'm sure with the higher oxydation factor considered the results are better and more consistent).

    PS: another interesting feature with the Fuji 6X kit is with a simple additives you can alter the colour balance in Colour Developer if you like. I do some shooting nocturnally or shortly post-sunset (goes blue for Fuji E6 films) so theorethically it can be chemically compensated by adding a little NaOH into FD solution that should be buyable from chemistry shops. Also it can be compensated a little "cooler" by adding a little H2SO4. This is something to try in the future - I'm sure when the compensation is done chemically it's artistically much better result than done in digital PP (pretty obviouys too, that's why we still shoot film). This chemical method could potentially work well for those nocturnal shots that are hard to tune right even with the warming filters. Food for thought for harmonizing my future shootings and developings.

    Just my 2c.
    Last edited by tsiklonaut; 02-17-2013 at 05:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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