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  1. #11
    Rudeofus's Avatar
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    +1 for Fuji Superia, it is more neutral and generic than the Kodak Portra and Ektar series, I use them as good overall films. What I have seen is that scan quality varies widely between labs, so your poor results may have come from that. Expect visible grain from ISO800 emulsions, and a bit less from ISO400.

    I personally don't think that Kodak, Fuji or llford sell any crap film these days. I've had my own share of trouble with a few emulsions, but looking through online resources showed me that most likely my poor technique was to blame (wrong choice of subject matter, poor scanning&post processing, ...). Calling any of these films a "steaming pile of ..." tells me more about the photographer than about the emulsion IMHO.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  2. #12
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    ...it is more neutral and generic than...

    What do you mean by "generic"?
    Apt for a wide range of subjects, in contrast to a film that, let's say, would be finetuned to skin tones?

  3. #13
    Rudeofus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    What do you mean by "generic"?
    Apt for a wide range of subjects, in contrast to a film that, let's say, would be finetuned to skin tones?
    Precisely. Skin tones and granularity may be nicer with Kodak's Portra, but Superia does extremely well with difficult lighting (partially light, partially shade), and I love its reproduction of natural green tones. In my opinion there is no such thing as "a best film", and in today's market there also exists no "bad color film". They all come with different characteristics and color palettes and we should choose them accordingly.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  4. #14
    destroya's Avatar
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    i went and bought a 4 pack of the 200 to try out. costs a whopping $7.50 with tax. So ill give it a try and judge for myself. using the card for development is an idea. I only use them for E-6 as they still send it our to fuji to get done. comes back mounted for $8. cheapest and fastest turnaround of any send out i've found.

  5. #15
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    I bought and shot a box of Fuji 200 color print from Wal-Mart earlier this year. I bought it because I really needed it for an event the next day and didn't have time for shipping from B&H. It's good quality film, but I had Dwayne's process it because I don't want any doubts or second thoughts while I'm waiting to get the results back. You can tell from the colors and grain that it ain't Portra, but on the whole it's pretty good. Compared to Kodak and Fuji offerings of similar type at B&H the Walmart price was roughly twice as expensive. You might want to spend the card on groceries or something else where the prices really do beat the usual alternatives. My local Walmart has some decent beers now.
    I confess I'm a gear nut within my price range. ;)
    Nikon FM2n, FG, FG20, N2000, Nikkormat, Olympus Stylus Epic
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    http://www.wendelstout.com/

  6. #16

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    I hated superia, but that is just my personal opinion. I prefer Ektar, Superia looked like total poo to my eyes, I also hated the grain! And that was both lab and home processed.

  7. #17
    Terry Christian's Avatar
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    fujicolor 200 at walmart

    Fuji Superia is a consumer film and will never be as good as any pro film like Portra or Ektar, but it's a fantastic everyday film! Stock up on 200 and 400; skip the 800.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephanie Brim View Post
    Because they don't give back negatives anymore?
    SERIOUSLY?!? I didn't know that...

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephanie Brim View Post
    Because they don't give back negatives anymore?
    Wow, even York/Clark gives back the negatives.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephanie Brim View Post
    Because they don't give back negatives anymore?
    They return 120 and 220 negatives in my experience. They also return E-6 mounted if it is 35mm. 120 and 220 E-6 comes back sleeved in an uncut roll. They charge $0.84 for developing a roll of 220 C-41. Not bad.

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