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  1. #11

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    I'd be worried about visible sparks from anything power operated, including battery tools. I hoping to
    get up to a friend's big lab storage locker to see what he's got leftover in roll trimmer equip. He did
    paper up to 60-inch wide. The wt of the 40" roll makes me wish I gotten 30" wide instead, but the
    bigger roll will be more cost effective if I need to get 20X24 or 20X30 sheets cut as well as 30X40.
    I have a big formica-covered cutting table with threaded inserts at key positions, so I can precisely
    place a stainless length stop for each dimension. There's a 48 inch dual-bar Rotatrim cutter at the
    business end, which I just have to modify a bit moer for the feed rollers below. Then the cut sizes
    go into big paper safes. I think I'll put the master roll itself back into a big tube of black ABS irrigation
    pipe with caps. Don't plan on making full size prints until Spring anyway. Got lots of fancy calibaration work to do in the meantime, plus lots of masking work on the original LF negs.

  2. #12
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    If the paint smells like ammonia, then yes there is a chance for fog.

    PE

  3. #13
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    I have cut prints from many boxes of 50 inch and 30 inch rolls.. other than a dispenser that cuts perfect cuts, here is how we do it. I SUSPECT YOU ARE TALKING MURALS HERE AND NOT SMALL PRINTS.


    lay the box on the floor. determine how much paper you need to cut with a tape measure, put the end of the tape on your paper box and measure on your body the length you
    need. Remember the point where ie your belly button, your neck , your nipples..

    then pull the paper emulsion towards you up to the point on your body, gently roll the paper back over the lip and cut along the edge of the box with a good olfa knife.
    close the box and put the paper on the wall or in your easel.

    this is a very tried and true method of cutting rolls and in many shops the only way the technicians will work. a rotary trimmer with flat surface is not an option for murals that I would recommend with this cutting from the box so simple and efficient.

    remember I am talking murals here and not a small prints.

  4. #14

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    Gosh that sounds crude, Bob. We're talking about 40" widths of polyester-based sheet, which is prone to crinkling. Maybe Supergloss is a little easier to handle than Ciba, but I'd dread ever working
    with Ciba that way. The floor ????????????????? Think I'll opt for Plan B. But as far as the local pro
    labs go, they used automated dispensers/cutters that originally cost in the 16-20K range apiece.
    For true mural sized fiber-based B&W rolls, they had vertical roll holders immediately adjacent to the
    vertical magnetic wall easels, then just pull the roll out to a stop and cut it off with an Olfa or bar
    trimmer. I prefer a vac easel, and have big built in masking bars for visible print borders. The paper
    is transferred from the table to the horizontal easil on a big sled, so that nothing gets scratched or
    crinkled. I went vertical. Had my horizontal enlgr days. But the damn thing is so tall that I have to
    load the neg carrier using a rolling warehouse ladder, the kind with steel stairs. But it works well
    for me. Are we all nuts or what? I'll admit that I am.

  5. #15
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Drew.
    without bragging , over 1000 rolls this method since 1978 with RA4 , Cibachrome, Black White Clean floor it works like magic .. I have been printing Cibas since 1983 and have made a few in my day.

    Sounds crude works like magic


    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    Gosh that sounds crude, Bob. We're talking about 40" widths of polyester-based sheet, which is prone to crinkling. Maybe Supergloss is a little easier to handle than Ciba, but I'd dread ever working
    with Ciba that way. The floor ????????????????? Think I'll opt for Plan B. But as far as the local pro
    labs go, they used automated dispensers/cutters that originally cost in the 16-20K range apiece.
    For true mural sized fiber-based B&W rolls, they had vertical roll holders immediately adjacent to the
    vertical magnetic wall easels, then just pull the roll out to a stop and cut it off with an Olfa or bar
    trimmer. I prefer a vac easel, and have big built in masking bars for visible print borders. The paper
    is transferred from the table to the horizontal easil on a big sled, so that nothing gets scratched or
    crinkled. I went vertical. Had my horizontal enlgr days. But the damn thing is so tall that I have to
    load the neg carrier using a rolling warehouse ladder, the kind with steel stairs. But it works well
    for me. Are we all nuts or what? I'll admit that I am.

  6. #16
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I have worked with the units on the wall, I have worked with the econorolls IMO the best, and cut from the box. The loading from the wall was the least effective and in the labs I worked at they had them but none of the printers used them.... the econorolls held two rolls and dropped the exact cut into a paper safe below the rolls. Took up little space and you could really rock through a roll of paper on a large job.

    A good day one could cut through five boxes of paper with little wastage, with the econoroll , no wastage.

    Would not want to do those volumnes these days, out of shape

  7. #17
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    We pretty much used Bob's method at Kodak. Remember that if your lab is clean, this method will present no problem at all. Just remember to avoid kinks. They cause fog. And, don't touch the emulsion side. We used cotton gloves.

    PE

  8. #18

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    I'd don't think we're talking about even the same planet here. But it's all academic, since my personal
    lab is pretty packed and I don't even have that kind of surplus floor space to desecrate expensive
    paper on anyway. And I need a variety of sizes from the same master roll. Previously Fujiflex was avail in cut sheets right up to 30X40. That would be nice to have again. The cutters I've seen were connected right to the easel, fed and sized right onto it automatically. Don't think I can get a free one of those bigger than 27 inch however. I want the 40X60 option still open, and I can do that on my present trimmer setup. I've already used it for regular C-paper in total darkness.

  9. #19

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    Without an automatic roll paper dispenser, cutting the paper the way carnie describes is the way that every lab tech does it. It is a simple, straight forward method that saves space as the operator is dispensing the paper vertically and then rolling it towards the lip of the box which will serve as an anvil for your cut (use some sort of straight edge, x-acto or olma). You'd have to be a complete beginner or a klutz to crimp the paper using this method.

  10. #20
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I did cut my finger once, and you do have to make sure the lip does not get sliced or you need to change bottom boxes, which if you do enough of this type of work there will be plenty of spare boxes.

    The weight of the roll holds your pull length.
    Quote Originally Posted by frotog View Post
    Without an automatic roll paper dispenser, cutting the paper the way carnie describes is the way that every lab tech does it. It is a simple, straight forward method that saves space as the operator is dispensing the paper vertically and then rolling it towards the lip of the box which will serve as an anvil for your cut (use some sort of straight edge, x-acto or olma). You'd have to be a complete beginner or a klutz to crimp the paper using this method.

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