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  1. #21
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    AgfaPhoto film material is, nowadays, Fujifilm material rebranded. AgfaPhoto also "brands" other kind of products.
    They use the "red dot" but the writing is always AgfaPhoto never Agfa.

    http://www.agfaphoto.com/appc/index.php

    Agfa-Gevaert is not a mere "brand" is the real firm behind it. They produce a lot of stuff not just aerial film and not just graphic material:

    http://www.agfa.com/global/en/main/index.jsp

    They still can use the AGFA "red rhombus" brand.

    Rollei film manufactured by Agfa-Gevaert is clearly marked as such.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  2. #22
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    AgfaPhoto film material is, nowadays, Fujifilm material rebranded. AgfaPhoto also "brands" other kind of products.
    They use the "red dot" but the writing is always AgfaPhoto never Agfa.

    http://www.agfaphoto.com/appc/index.php

    Agfa-Gevaert is not a mere "brand" is the real firm behind it. They produce a lot of stuff not just aerial film and not just graphic material:

    http://www.agfa.com/global/en/main/index.jsp

    They still can use the AGFA "red rhombus" brand.

    Rollei film manufactured by Agfa-Gevaert is clearly marked as such.
    But that does not mean that it bears any resemblance to the old Agfa film products we grew up with in the orange boxes, just that it's being coated by the same company, it would be no more or less an Agfa film product if it was coated in Rochester, Tokyo or Mobberly.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    But that does not mean that it bears any resemblance to the old Agfa film products we grew up with in the orange boxes, just that it's being coated by the same company, it would be no more or less an Agfa film product if it was coated in Rochester, Tokyo or Mobberly.
    True, but that can be said of any manufacturer. The Kodak film of today may or may not bear a resemblance to the film the company made in the 1960s, but that does not mean it's not Kodak film. I believe what the poster was trying to say is that AgfaPhoto is simply a licensed name, with really no ties or connection to the original company. However, Agfa-Gevaert is the original company and they still make film, even if it is sold under other brand names.

  4. #24
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    Okay in the case of Agfa-Gevaert there is a possibility they are making consumer film under contract to Maco, Rollie and Adox, that's NOT Agfa labelled film, whether it's an old Agfa-Gevaert emulsion or not, you would need to confirm with Maco, Rollie or Adox.
    As said before: Agfa does not make consumer film. Nor do they make such on contract at the moment. (They were involved in a joint venture on paper, and are involved in another venture). However films out of their range are bought by Maco and Fotoimpex. With two films added by a proprietary (non-Agfa) developer.
    In nearly all cases Maco labels those films originating from Agfa with the Agfa label.



    For those new on that Agfa issue:

    AgfaPhoto is a designation used sparcely by Agfa since the late 90's or so to indicate their Consumer Branch.
    However it was not used as brand.

    When Agfa sold off that department in 2004 the new entity and its holding company got the name AgfaPhoto.

    The life of that production company was only for some months, then it went mysteriously bancrupt. The holding company still exists.
    It sold off remnants out of the film stock (either manufactured by Agfa or Agfaphoto). The AgfaPhoto APX is out of that stock. When their colour film stock ended they rebranded films from other manufacturers.

    AgfaPhoto of today is not a manufacturer. Furthermore they license the name AgfaPhoto for different kind of photo-related products.

    Agfa which is still alive and huge and still owner of the brandname Agfaphoto started a legal case against that rebranding with their name but lost the case.




    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    Agfa's old industrial division may coat film, they may coat it by the ship load,...
    That "old division" is the place were Agfa thrived on, not Leverkusen.

    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    From what I understand they do manufacture xray and other diagnostic and scientific materials, but that's not the same.

    The link between consumer and industrial product was of extreme importance. And still is. Photo Engineer has repeatedly hinted at that. Looking at the past you will hardly find any company related to film only based on consumer products (Polaroid having been the major excemption, and even they had Kodak manufacturing for them).

    Even Simon Galley of IlfordPhoto will admit that this company is part of a larger entity that is trying to regain the industrial market.
    Mirko Böddekker of Fotoimpex/Adox has repeatedly hinted at the difficulties and limitations an endeaveour solely related to consumer products (as Adox) has to bear.
    Mirco could not yet have made his new materials without the assistance of partners involved in making industrial materials.
    Last edited by AgX; 11-30-2012 at 12:40 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #25
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    For the curious:

    http://www.agfa.com/co/global/en/int...rAgfaPhoto.jsp

    Nowadays AgfaPhoto is a generic photography-related brand like Vivitar, Revue or the distribution business of Hama and has nothing to do with Agfa-Gevaert which is a real film manufacturer.

    The firm using the brand AgfaPhoto doesn't manufacture anything if I get it right.

    I probably did not state this clearly in my previous post.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
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  6. #26

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    Kodak, simply because I'm used to it. Being used to a set of products is actually pretty important in picture making. I've used a fair amount of Fuji film, and it is good material. But there are unpredictables, simply because I'm not used to it. I also used a fair amount of Agfa color negative sheet film several years ago. It worked well enough, but it was very different from Kodak - mostly softer.

  7. #27
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyD58 View Post
    True, but that can be said of any manufacturer. The Kodak film of today may or may not bear a resemblance to the film the company made in the 1960s, but that does not mean it's not Kodak film. I believe what the poster was trying to say is that AgfaPhoto is simply a licensed name, with really no ties or connection to the original company. However, Agfa-Gevaert is the original company and they still make film, even if it is sold under other brand names.
    The real issue though, as we keep fooling around to keep old dead films and companies around, we are losing new films. As I said before, Agfa is dead, Ferrania is dead, Konica is dead, Kodachrome is dead. If you really want to use colour film, there are some nice modern films, that are current products of Kodak and Fuji, so use them, be happy using them, because if we don't we end up losing those too. So buy your film fresh, use it fresh, and be thankful you still can.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  8. #28
    AgX
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    Well, I turn my head 180° and look ahead. There is the future. You are right. You are right in appealling to stop beating dead horses and buy films instead. The only problem is that Apug with its 60,000 members is too small to make a significant impact.

    The main issue at the industry now is productivity.
    Last edited by AgX; 11-30-2012 at 07:34 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #29
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    Well, I turn my head 180° and look ahead. There is the future. You are right. You are right in appealling to stop beating dead horses and buy films instead. The only problem is that Apug with its 60,000 members is too small to make a significant impact.

    The main issue at the industry now is productivity.
    The problem with film, is that for about 50 years, they couldn't make it fast enough, so they developed larger and larger scale production facilities, when the market started to shrink, there was no way to shrink supply to meet the new levels of demand. For a while now, the only way to shrink supply has been to reduce the number of products and facilities. The largest user of film is still Hollywood, and print films are the ones most commonly used. This is changing though, and I would not be surprised to see at least one company close their coating facility in the next 3-4 years, if I were to guess, it will probably be the Kodak facility in Rochester. Because Ilford, A-G and Fuji will be enough to sustain the smaller market. Doesn't mean that Kodak will disappear, they would simply hire out film and paper coating to others. Ilford has already said they will coat for hire and they have the machinery in place to do colour emulsions at their UK facility. It would be simple, Ilford coats the masters and ships them to Rochester where they cut them into portions, and freeze them. As they need finished film they thaw a portion and finish it. When they thaw the last portion, they ring up Moberly and get another master roll shipped over.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  10. #30
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Paul;

    Film in master rolls is not frozen and does not keep forever! This just cannot be done. It is kept cold, for a limited time and then must be discarded.

    PE

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