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  1. #1

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    What do you do with slides?

    I just got back from the lab a roll of Provia 100F. I am continually amazed at the level of color in this film, although the skin tones sometimes seem too saturated. Still, it is a very impressive film and can be viewed by eye a bit as I am shooting 6 x 4.5. The slides are so impressive that I am tempted to shoot an even larger format, possibly 6 x 7. But I'm wondering how most people use slides that they make. Projecting is not very common is it? Are slides enjoyable just looking on a light table? Do you also use a loupe? Do you find (insert the word that dare not be used here)-ing them to be satisfactory?

    I am tempted to shoot more Provia film, but at the end of the day, it seems that I am confused at how best to use them. The computer screen perhaps is not my answer even though that is the easiest.

    Sorry for rambling on.....

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by henry finley View Post
    I hate seeing slides go by the wayside. But when I think about it, with no more Kodachrome, the purpose of color is gone. Kodachrome never faded. All the E4 and E6, all the C22 and C41 just all fades away. Black and White doesn't, so all we really have anymore is BW, practically speaking. Otherwise, a 35mm and Kodachrome is the best answer for color. I hate the computer.
    Huh. I have C-41 negatives from the 80's that are fine, and some negatives my dad made in the 60's which are fine too. No evidence of fading yet. Lots of cheapo prints have faded or gotten weird colors but using a good lab, as I tried to do when I could afford it, seems to be paying off in negative longevity. I know 30 years isn't Kodachrome time and I know everything will fade eventually. So far so good. My eldest E6 slides also 30 years old are in good shape too.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  3. #3

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    ^^ I always thought slides in general (be it Kodachrome, Velvia, Provia, or E100VS) were meant to outlast colour negative (which should have a long-ish shelf life itself).

  4. #4

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    Anyone want to discuss my questions?

  5. #5
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I project some, and scan some, and print from scan some.

    And I've yet to take up the offer of a couple of friends of mine to share in their large stash of Ilfiochrome materials, to print some.

    Properly processed and stored modern Ektachrome is likely to last well for a long time. Properly processed slightly older Ektachrome will last fairly well.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #6
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    Anyone want to discuss my questions?
    Fine, I'll say it... You scan them!! That's pretty much what anyone still shooting color E-6 or C-41 does anymore.

  7. #7
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    ^ Problem with scanning these 120 transparencies is that it takes a great scanner, like the Nikon Coolscan 8000 or 9000 to get the information out of them. Otherwise if you don't mind sending them out and paying a drum scan is the ultimate.

  8. #8
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    RattyMouse,

    35mm slides you project because you can get a projector easily.

    But medium format you get published in a book or magazine printed by Offset Lithography.

    Let the publisher worry about all the production technique.

    Shoot lots of vertical compositions. Publishers need that for their pages.

    Include out-of-focus or dropout backgrounds which leave room for the magazine's logo and headlines.

  9. #9
    BradS's Avatar
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    if you like the 6x4.5 color slides...you should have a look at a 4x5! I just lay 'em on the light table and enjoy. Sometimes, I'll tape one to a window.

  10. #10
    RPC
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    If slides are your medium of choice then get a good projector. In my opinion you would be making the most of them; projected slides can be awesome, superior to scanning and viewing on a monitor. Larger formats would be more so. Just because it's not common doesn't mean you can't do it.

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