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  1. #31

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    North Yorkshire, England
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    Digibase CR200

    To reply to the questions in the last 3 posts. The film was rated at the standard 200 ISO. Taken with a Nikon F100. The processing times are as shown in the table I sent at the top part of the previous page,

    Tetenal chemicals last as long as almost any others provided they are stored properly. The 1st developer seems to be the only one that 'goes off' so I squeeze the bottles to get rid of as much of the air as possible then screw on the cap tightly but place the bottle upside down in the box. This seems to preserve the contents better than just standing it upright- don't ask me why, 'cos I don't know, but it does. I have just finished one kit with about 10cc's of developer remaining and this is still light straw coloured. When I start my next kit I will not use this left over bit anyway.

    I have been thinking about getting small dark brown glass bottles from my Pharmacy (50CC) to decant the 1st developer into because glass is a better preservative. Plastics are not fully impermeable against Oxygen.



    (The placing the bottles upside down was done really as a test because of the results I get with part used tins of paint. Treated this way they never form a skin over the remaining usable contents. A wet contact with the seal seems to stop ingress of any air. I don't know if this is correct, but I only go on what I find and it seems to work.)
    Last edited by BMbikerider; 01-21-2013 at 09:34 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #32

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    So is this a form of push/pull processing that you are doing with this film BMbikerider?
    If so, i may be able to get the lab to get me similar results if i know how much to push/pull it by.

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nzoomed View Post
    So is this a form of push/pull processing that you are doing with this film BMbikerider?
    If so, i may be able to get the lab to get me similar results if i know how much to push/pull it by.
    Any pro lab will be able to push or pull your film, at a cost. (Usually, this cost ranges from +50% to +100% of simple development cost per stop of push).
    Pushing slides is done by either extending the dev time or raising the temperature of the first developer. (The first developer acts like a simple B&W developer).

    Some very useful guidelines regarding times and temperatures can be found in the thirteenth page of that document ===> http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/j83/j83.pdf
    I screencapped and attached the interesting part:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screen shot 2013-01-27 at 4.14.54 PM.png 
Views:	16 
Size:	72.8 KB 
ID:	63206

    Anyway, you're not required to know all this stuff, since the lab will do the pushing. You need to tell them how many stops you need your film pushed. Some pro labs can go in increments as small as 1/3 of a stop.

    What you need to know though, is that each layer of colour films reacts differently to pushing, so some layers will get developed more in proportion to others, resulting in colour shifts. Contrast also increases and grain gets coarser. Each film is different, and I found the Provia 400X to be the best performing in pushing, with virtually no colour shift and contrast increase, and minimal increase in grain, up to ISO1600.

    So, my suggestion is, to try and fine tune your exposure before resorting to pushing. It'smuch more difficult to correct the weird colour casts you're getting by pushing than by exposure.
    Just try bracketing your shots in 1/3 increments. I have a hunch that you're gonna get the results you want by overexposing ~2/3 of a stop. (Or just setting the ISO to ~140).

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by giannisg2004 View Post
    Any pro lab will be able to push or pull your film, at a cost. (Usually, this cost ranges from +50% to +100% of simple development cost per stop of push).
    Pushing slides is done by either extending the dev time or raising the temperature of the first developer. (The first developer acts like a simple B&W developer).

    Some very useful guidelines regarding times and temperatures can be found in the thirteenth page of that document ===> http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/j83/j83.pdf
    I screencapped and attached the interesting part:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screen shot 2013-01-27 at 4.14.54 PM.png 
Views:	16 
Size:	72.8 KB 
ID:	63206

    Anyway, you're not required to know all this stuff, since the lab will do the pushing. You need to tell them how many stops you need your film pushed. Some pro labs can go in increments as small as 1/3 of a stop.

    What you need to know though, is that each layer of colour films reacts differently to pushing, so some layers will get developed more in proportion to others, resulting in colour shifts. Contrast also increases and grain gets coarser. Each film is different, and I found the Provia 400X to be the best performing in pushing, with virtually no colour shift and contrast increase, and minimal increase in grain, up to ISO1600.

    So, my suggestion is, to try and fine tune your exposure before resorting to pushing. It'smuch more difficult to correct the weird colour casts you're getting by pushing than by exposure.
    Just try bracketing your shots in 1/3 increments. I have a hunch that you're gonna get the results you want by overexposing ~2/3 of a stop. (Or just setting the ISO to ~140).

    Thats interesting info.
    The lab I use can push/pull in small increments, so thats good im guessing that BMbikerider is probably pushing it by about half a stop or a full stop by his method, i think the key is to push process it in a way that gives the image a blue shift, as that should neutralise the yellow tones.

    Has anyone experimented with push/pull processing this film? As i will more than likely be doing that with this film.

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