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  1. #11

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    I'm making internegs with Kodak color neg sheet film then printing them onto Fuji CAII. It's a whole
    new learning curve since the demise of Ciba, and way too complicated in nuances to describe here
    if one expects very high quality results (I do). But it can be done. A dedicated interneg film is not
    necessary, and would be obsolete anyway. But other than that general remark, the details get fairly
    technical.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkroom_rookie View Post
    Stephen, is this manipulation specific to Ilfoflex (not easily available!) or could it work with Crystal Archive, be it Type I or II? I'm still interested in this process. Could you provide more detailed information?
    the other papers are a lot harder to control the contrast and colour with, they also have chemical issues with consistency and some papers get an odd mottle though them. The Ilfoflex is by far the most stable and consistent for Ra-4 reversal and with its high gloss using the same base as Ilfochrome it has a very similar feel.
    I strongly feel the only way forward for ilfochrome in analog is Ilfoflex reversal.
    "Its my profession to hijack time" ~ Stephen Frizza.

  3. #13

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    Where on earth are you getting Ilfoflex from? Are you in North America?

  4. #14
    AgX
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    Wayne, I guess you are located in the US. At first glance I can't find a dealer there. Ask Ilford. They are in Conneticut.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Frizza View Post
    the other papers are a lot harder to control the contrast and colour with, they also have chemical issues with consistency and some papers get an odd mottle though them. The Ilfoflex is by far the most stable and consistent for Ra-4 reversal and with its high gloss using the same base as Ilfochrome it has a very similar feel.
    I strongly feel the only way forward for ilfochrome in analog is Ilfoflex reversal.
    Mottle seems to be/have been an issue with Kodak Radiance R3 papers as well. So it's all about the Melinex polyester base... But what about the satisfying color balance? How do you manage that? Shame this thread is about to get buried since most people gave up on optical printing of slide film.
    And really, where does one obtain Ilfoflex in Europe?

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkroom_rookie View Post
    Mottle seems to be/have been an issue with Kodak Radiance R3 papers as well. So it's all about the Melinex polyester base... But what about the satisfying color balance? How do you manage that? Shame this thread is about to get buried since most people gave up on optical printing of slide film.
    And really, where does one obtain Ilfoflex in Europe?
    colour accuracy Isnt a problem with Ilfoflex. I have printed off color tests with various colour charts. A grey scale chart is neutral, and there is no issues with colour crossover. The main issue is contrast. The Ilfoflex causes the developer to exhaust quickly and as a result the contrast drops so you need to balance the replenishment just right to maintain consistent results. It ends up being an expensive process not just because of the paper but the developer requirements.
    "Its my profession to hijack time" ~ Stephen Frizza.

  7. #17
    AgX
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    The Ilfoflex causes the developer to exhaust quickly.
    Interesting, I was in the belief all RA-papers behaved the same concerning processing.

  8. #18

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    If I recall correctly, Ilfoflex isn't a paper but a polyester material. The datasheet is here.

    Recommended replenishment is 250ml per square-metre for Ilfoflex, while for Kodak's standard RA4 process it is 170ml (depends somewhat on the machine and manner of replenishment, according to their docs) so there is a slight difference in recommended use. Why? - I have no idea, but also don't forget reversal processing is not exactly the expected manner of using the materials, so there will be further differences due to that for sure.
    Last edited by MartinP; 01-25-2013 at 04:53 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: finger trouble

  9. #19

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    So where can you buy this paper / material from?
    Steve.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by perkeleellinen View Post
    So where can you buy this paper / material from?
    Good question. Out of curiosity, I looked on the website and the nearest to me seemed to be in Germany (next door country) but that supplier no longer had it listed on their website.

    The Ilford (ie. the Swiss company, not Harman in UK) website is here, so one could ask them directly I suppose. The sizes listed were only large rolls from what I saw, so it might not be very convenient for amateur darkroom use.

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