Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,999   Posts: 1,524,314   Online: 874
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 13 of 13
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    272
    yeah i'm probably worrying about this too much. honestly i'm thinking of just getting the film shot at:

    1600 pushed 2 stops
    800 pushed 1 stop
    200 pushed 1 stop

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    272
    This is probably the last time I push film before figuring out what dev times work best :P

    edit: So would it be safer to just get the push done or develop at box speed?
    Last edited by tron_; 01-21-2013 at 02:21 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,103
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by tron_ View Post
    This is probably the last time I push film before figuring out what dev times work best :P
    Just for clarity:

    "Pushing" film refers only to a modification of the standard development process.

    It has nothing directly to do with exposure.

    If you meter using a higher than box speed EI, you are intentionally under-exposing the film.

    If you under-expose, you can save a portion of the image by using a push development to increase the contrast of the near-shadow parts of the scene - often at the expense of highlight detail.

    Instead of referring to it as "pushing" film, it would be better to refer to it as "intentionally under-expose" film.

    I think that you understand this, but may not understand how confusing the nomenclature can be.

    EDIT: and as for the question about whether to request that the lab "push" the development, the answer depends on whether you want the contrast increased. "Pushing" won't help (much) with the shadow detail, but it will improve the contrast in the near shadows. So if the scene and lighting were low in contrast, then a "push" would be potentially useful. If the scene and lighting were high in contrast, then you will lose quality in the highlights if the film is "pushed".

    If the scene and lighting were high in contrast, only you can decide what is more important - the near-shadow contrast or the highlight detail.

    I think it is useful to remember that for most (or possibly all) of the films you list in your first post, Kodak recommends no change in development for film exposed at one stop less than the ISO speed.
    Last edited by MattKing; 01-21-2013 at 02:38 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin