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  1. #21
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    But (leaving aside the fenomenon of solarisation) there is a level of saturation of the halides (that will produce Dmax in development). And the exposure of the rebate-signing is in the same range.
    Yes, but in the same soup, at the same temperature, they got developed, and the other 'stuff' did not. What else can it possibly be? It is, all other things equal, the only variable.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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  2. #22
    AgX
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    The leader might show printed out silver (thus without development) due to the strong exposure you hinted at.
    Which would mean that bleaching would have not worked either.

  3. #23
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    Old film processing

    I wonder if PE just searches for "PE" every night and responds when he can LOL


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  4. #24

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    If it were my film, I would develop the C-41 for a longer time or even at a lower temperature and even longer time yet. I would bleach/fix it for longer time too, like ten minutes.

    From my understanding Blix is to completion. I think 4 minutes is too short for such aged exposures.

    You are going to get color shifts anyway that will have to be corrected in post.
    - Bill Lynch

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Wait are you the guy I was referring to? Can you post the times I never wrote it down last time .. I will this time I swear! lol
    C22 dev as a starting point 20 minutes at 20C, bleach 10min, fix 10min. Bleach and fix times are a bit overkilled, with fresh chem they will go to completion faster (5-6 min).

    For C41 film dev time is a bit longer, 22-23min, for those Agfacolor CN17 films I use slightly less, 18 min.

    All those times are with replenished Tetenal ergoline minilab C-41 chemistry, separate dev/bleach/fix. Between steps I rinse 2x15 inversions with water. After final wash ca 1min in C-41 stabilisator. That's basically it.
    My usual room temperature is ca 22C, so the actual times are accordingly a bit shorter.

  6. #26
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Old film processing

    Quote Originally Posted by werra View Post
    C22 dev as a starting point 20 minutes at 20C, bleach 10min, fix 10min. Bleach and fix times are a bit overkilled, with fresh chem they will go to completion faster (5-6 min).

    For C41 film dev time is a bit longer, 22-23min, for those Agfacolor CN17 films I use slightly less, 18 min.

    All those times are with replenished Tetenal ergoline minilab C-41 chemistry, separate dev/bleach/fix. Between steps I rinse 2x15 inversions with water. After final wash ca 1min in C-41 stabilisator. That's basically it.
    My usual room temperature is ca 22C, so the actual times are accordingly a bit shorter.
    Thanks! PS you have a warm house...


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  7. #27
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    When you process color film THAT old you must remember that much, much speed is lost through the decades, probably four, or even five, stops. Thus, the film has been grossly underexposed and that underexposure also attends to the manufacturer's markings on the borders (which were also exposed back in the seventies before you bought the film). Thus, in your immediate case the ONLY thing you could have done was to give GROSS overdevelopment in hopes of getting something. I would have developed for about three times normal in your dire case.

    And, wblynch is correct with the advice to blix longer. Old film is a pain but can be at least partially ressurrected. Blix is, indeed, 'to completion', as wblynch says. - David Lyga
    Last edited by David Lyga; 02-14-2013 at 09:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #28
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    keystroke error.

  9. #29
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    Old film processing

    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    When you process color film THAT old you must remember that much, much speed is lost through the decades, probably four, or even five, stops. Thus, the film has been grossly underexposed and that underexposure also attends to the manufacturer's markings on the borders (which were also exposed back in the seventies before you bought the film). Thus, in your immediate case the ONLY thing you could have done was to give GROSS overdevelopment in hopes of getting something. I would have developed for about three times normal in your dire case.

    And, wblynch is correct with the advice to blix longer. Old film is a pain but can be at least partially ressurrected. Blix is, indeed, 'to completion', as wblynch says. - David Lyga
    David, you know stuff so not saying you're wrong, BUT

    The speed loss is often in the exposure level, so if the film was already previously exposed he wouldn't be losing any more speed, these rolls as I remember had already been shot? They are just being developed now, so speed loss isn't an issue, just developing. Unless I'm totally thinking of another thread. Lol


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  10. #30

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    Like a magnetic tape recording that fades over time, they lose their latent image over the years. It ends up like they were underexposed. That plus base fog has also built up so you need to develop your image above the base fog.

    But part of what you're saying is true.

    I once found a half-used 12 year old film in a camera and shot the rest of the roll before sending it out. The original shots were diminished from new but still pretty good. The new shots were all messed up.
    - Bill Lynch

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