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  1. #1

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    E6 development without Jobo etc.

    Morning,

    Last week I found a pack of the Tetenal E6 kit on sale at my local photo dealer, 5 euros... As I've been thinking for a while now that I should start developing C-41 as well at home I jumped this in a second seeing it as a great price to get started with color home development, and if things go south there's no loss really. Now I just have to get some cheap reversal film to try with as well.

    I've been thinking about getting one of these: http://goo.gl/zxWZZ (yeah it's in french, I live in the south of France, but you see the photo of the item) in order to keep the temperature, if it works for food I assume it would work to keep development tank and bottles warm as well.

    And in addition to this, I think I will get an extra Paterson tank + reels dedicated for this process, maybe it's not necessary but hey, who's not anal on this forum....




    So those of you who do this without a Jobo, any advice and experience to share?




    Thanks!



    Cheers
    JF Felinik
    http://street-photos.net/ | http://felinik.com/ | http://www.facebook.com/jf.felinik

    "The one with the most stuff when he dies wins"

  2. #2

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    I get my E6 and C41 chemicals up to the correct temperature using a dedicated microwave. I always get great results. I do not use a bath to keep the temperature consistent. Also, C41 and E6 chemicals last a lot longer than stated as far as number of rolls you are able to develop and lifespan. Of course, your results are what count. With E6 I follow the recommended rolls per liter - about 8, but the life span is longer than stated. With E6 the temperature is only critical for the first developer and the color not so much. I warm up the color developer in the same way, but it can be used from 95 degrees and up so by the time you get to it (about 6 minutes after the first) it is at an acceptable temperature. For the blix, the times are the same for 75 degrees fahrenheit through 100 degrees so that can remain at room temperature.

    Follow the instructions and experiment.

  3. #3
    destroya's Avatar
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    i do my e-6 in a Paterson at home. get a very large (14quart) slow cooker that has a temp setting, the cheaper the better. set it on low and it keeps all your chems at 100 spot on for hours. I have done many batches of c-41 and e-6 with the tetenal kit and they come out perfect.

    the first time you un-spool an roll of slide film to hang and dry, it will bring a huge smile to your face

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by destroya View Post
    . . . the first time you un-spool an roll of slide film to hang and dry, it will bring a huge smile to your face
    So true...!

  5. #5

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    Sounds indeed like a thrilling experience! I have to go get me some reversal film!

    http://street-photos.net/ | http://felinik.com/ | http://www.facebook.com/jf.felinik

    "The one with the most stuff when he dies wins"

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by destroya View Post
    i do my e-6 in a Paterson at home. get a very large (14quart) slow cooker that has a temp setting, the cheaper the better. set it on low and it keeps all your chems at 100 spot on for hours. I have done many batches of c-41 and e-6 with the tetenal kit and they come out perfect...
    My experience with slow cookers is that they get a lot hotter than 100, even on low. How do you keep the temperature so stable without overheating?
    Last edited by madgardener; 02-14-2013 at 07:02 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Punctuation

  7. #7
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by madgardener View Post
    My experience with slow cookers is that they get a lot hotter than 100, even on low. How do you keep the temperature so stable without overheating?
    This thread caught my eye. I would love to give home color a try and thought the crock pot (slow cooker) sounded like it might be worth a try. I use ours pretty regularly for food, but never anything like this and my thought too was it would still be too hot, but then thought maybe with the cover off, it would do a better job as a water bath the heat would not accumulate under the heavy cover. Well, just tried an experiment this AM with some plain water. With the lid off, after a long enough time to stabilize the temp, it was around 110F. Actually, it varied around the pot somewhat, from 109 to 116F. Are there better controlled pots with actual temp settings? Ours just has "low" and "high."
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  8. #8
    destroya's Avatar
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    The slow cooker/crock pot works great! I bought this one at walmart when it was on sale for $18. works like a charm. the cheaper models have the nob like this one that goes from a keep warm up to 450 degrees. somewhere half way in the keep warm range it will hold the water in the tub at 100. i usually do it in the bathroom and put warm water in it to begin with. I use 30 ounce brown glass bottles to keep them chems in as they star warmer that way. I turn on the cooker and them fill the bottles with the chems and then put them in the cooker for about 30-45 minutes to come to temp. I have one filled with water and have a thermometer in it to measure the temp. I can then fine tune it (kind of) by adjusting the temps. it works great. I got the idea from a link in a post from here. I have it saved at home but im at work so i dont have it with me. will try to post it later. here is a link to the cooker i bought. Get the cheapest one you can find and make sure never to cook withit

    http://www.amazon.com/Rival-RO180-18...RO180+18-Quart

  9. #9
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    destroya, thanks for the link. I'll have a look at one. It does appear the temp control has finer settings.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  10. #10

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    That's a turkey roaster, not a crock pot. I have been thinking about getting one of those myself. Glad to hear they work so well though.

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