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  1. #1
    Rhodes's Avatar
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    Is this good develop E6?

    I ask more in line of "are the chemicals still good?" because of my previous thread. When I pick the tetenal kit (opned 4 or 5 months ago and half full) to do the working solutions, the FD was dark yellow with deposits. I decided to do a test with a agfa precisa 100 roll, since I got 5 this week. This are the results:









    For me they apper fine and now I am thinking fo developing the slide films that I have waiting for it. But want to ask your opinion first.

  2. #2

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    Looks fine to me, but I'm paranoid, so I'd probably do each roll at a time to make sure they are OK individually.

  3. #3
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    It's hard to tell from a scan because it's the colour balance that will be most affected.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  4. #4

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    How do they look like if projected?
    I suppose the are marvellous this way and the slight magenta cast is only a scanner issue.

    If the slight magenta cast is not only an scanner issue and visible in the projected slide think about slight pH modifications of the CD.
    Look at the Jobo e6 Manual page 76 and 91 and following pages.

    http://www.jobo.com/jobo_service_ana...andbuch_GB.pdf

    Regards stefan

  5. #5
    Rhodes's Avatar
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    Thanks. I did not project them yet, would that in the weekend. I did not correct the hite balance in all the slides after scanning. The auto function added to much warm tone and I preffer them with the blue tone of the sea. The magenta could be because of that.

  6. #6
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    In my limited experience E6 doesn't just up and die. It slowly starts shifting to give more and more magenta. You'll know when its dying.
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  7. #7
    Rhodes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EASmithV View Post
    In my limited experience E6 doesn't just up and die. It slowly starts shifting to give more and more magenta. You'll know when its dying.
    I know that the film does shift to the magenta with age, did not know that the chemicals did the same.

  8. #8

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    Color balance

    Agreed, I had a roll of E100G I decided to develop in 4 or 5 month old Kodak E6 chemicals just to see what effect it would have. The roll was distinctly yellowish and under developed even though I added developer time. I was still able to correct after scanning although they looked pretty rough on a light table.

    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoJim View Post
    It's hard to tell from a scan because it's the colour balance that will be most affected.

  9. #9
    Rhodes's Avatar
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    I see, but a color cast that is "unnatural" on a e-6 film after development is easy see when seeing the film at light or in a light table correct? And the same cast is also present after scanning (with out any corrections)?

  10. #10

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    Formally colour shifts can be best recognized on a light table. Especially if you compare the questionable film strip with others, well developed films. What scanner / scanner software are doing with films depends on their “targets” an is a different story.

    The benefit of projecting is, that the human eye does permanent a kind of automatic white balance anyway. That’s why I asked weather projected or not. A slight colour shift will be corrected automatically, in opposite to an colour crossover…

    Again I would say your slides will project marvellous, especially the fourth which have a nice combination of perspective and stunning sky. This really looks like you had fun taking that picture, and this way it should be. Don’t be to picky with minor colour shifts, “unnatural” shifts really look a lot different. Have a eye on the Jobo E6 manual, (or try a complete homebrew of chemicals). Than you may see some significant shifts and crossovers

    Regards Stefan

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