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  1. #1

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    Is it me, or is it Ektar?

    I've seen some of the threads here concerning Ektar 100, and impressions seem to vary from "greatest thing since sliced bread" to "Kodak was having a bad hair day".

    I tried some recently, as I thought it might be a good film to take to England with me next week. But my results were not good.

    Basically, I have a lot of color crossover. If I try to get the filtration right for most tones, the shadow areas end up very blue. The film seems to need more red filtration than others. But the crossover is the killer. Portra, on the other hand, is quite easy to print with.

    I've heard about color casts with Ektar, but is crossover in shadow areas a common problem? Or perhaps it is my developing - but I have not had this problem with other films.

    I'd be interested in reactions. Meanwhile, I think instead I'll be tapping my vast quantities of unperforated Portra 160 instead, and my trusty Nikkormat (converted to non-perf film) is going to have to be my travel companion.

  2. #2
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Ektar 100 is both contrasty and oriented toward colour saturation.

    And in real life, shadows often are a bit blue (open shade lighting).

    So Ektar tends to make the blueness of shadows quite obvious.

    It isn't really crossover - instead it is just accentuating the situation when scenes are receiving illumination from multiple sources.

    If you expose Ektar 100 in the studio with controlled lighting, you won't see blue shadows.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #3

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    Well then maybe I need to find a different use for it. The scenes I had most trouble with were open landscapes with hills in the background, where the hills would be too blue. Maybe it would be better for things like urban scenes on an overcast day. I can use it in studio also, but that is not what I bought it for.

  4. #4

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    Try a warming filter on your camera and I think your problem will go away.

  5. #5
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Is it me, or is it Ektar?

    Quote Originally Posted by Stew View Post
    Try a warming filter on your camera and I think your problem will go away.
    How does a warming filter solve color crossover the OP is finding?
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

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  6. #6
    Fixcinater's Avatar
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    I recently processed my first roll of Ektar (35mm), I was likewise surprised by the saturation and tendency for shadows to go very blue. In an image editing software program I was able to warm the shadows without throwing off midrange and higher tones, but I have not done any optical color printing so I'm no help there.

  7. #7
    M.A.Longmore's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=newcan1;Maybe it would be better for things like urban scenes on an overcast day. I can use it in studio also, but that is not what I bought it for.[/QUOTE]

    Ektar 100:
    You give us those nice bright colors
    You give us the greens of summers
    Makes you think all the world's a sunny day, oh yeah !

    Let the lyrics be your guidance, overcast days will take just your Ektar 100 away, unfortunately.

    Ron
    .

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  8. #8

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    Ron, my problem is that when the world is indeed a sunny day, the shadows are blue! And the rest of the colors, while saturated, are not really very pleasant.

  9. #9

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    I tried Ektar 120 recently when I bought a Bronica and the 1st roll was dreadful. I processed it for the normal time at the normal temperature but it looked to way over developed with hellish contrast. There was as you describe very blue shadow areas - not dense shadows that could not be dialed out using filtration, because then it became overall yellow.

    I think it was a problem of some degree of over development, despite processing it as per normal which gave rise to 'crossed curves' (where the three colours develop at different rates, not what they are designed to) What was also of note was the base colour of the film was a darkish brown, not orange as I normally get on other films. The later films were a little better but not perfect in that respect. Even scanning it was little better and the roll will stay with me as a reminder what a failure looks like

    The 2nd roll was better when exposed on a dull day and the third roll also exposed on a day with subdued sunlight wasn't bad either. I have yet to make any 'proper' prints but when I do I will scan and upload them. I will not be using Ektar again.

  10. #10

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    My base color was orange, not brown. But the rest of your experience is similar to mine.

    I'll take a couple of rolls of 120 with me and try it on urban scenes with even lighting, but otherwise, I'm going with Portra and a few other things (Fuji F-500 movie stock, among others - which I've found to be an outstanding fine grained film when shot at 160 ASA - and maybe some Kodak Vision2 250D).

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