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  1. #11
    Rhodes's Avatar
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    The tetenal E6 3 bath kit has a stabilizer bath as the final step, with formaldehyde I think.

  2. #12
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Develop, Color Develop, Blix - Ergo, 3 bath. At least that has been reported here over and over, and I tell them to use a stabilizer or final rinse as recommended by the film companies.

    Do you know for sure? I am only quoting a multitude of others seeking advice here and I am only referring to the 3 bath statement by the companies that make 3 bath E6 kits.

    Remember that these companies produce no film and do no extensive R&D. Kodak, Fuji, Agfa and Ilford are the R&D companies that do everything. I must say though that Fuji does little process R&D.

    PE

  3. #13
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    Ah I see - yes, if I go back to doing my own color I will definitely use a stabilizer, bought separately if not included.

    Are there any hazards to longevity from the use of bleach-fix, or just differences in density and color purity (which may or may not matter to a given individual and their results?)

  4. #14
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    A bleach and a fix are more stable than a blix.

    A single part blix is very unstable. See posts here!

    PE

  5. #15
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    Well I meant the longevity of the image formed, but that's good to know. Thing is, though, either usually comes together (or did in the old days, I guess now for stuff like Kodak it's big quantities of each solution) in a kit, and however unstable a bleach-fix may be, developer was more so. I mixed enough for one session and used it all one shot so it didn't much matter how long it lasted at working solution. In concentrate form I mostly used it up before it went bad and, if I didn't, it was the developer that seemed to die.

    The big issue now though is that only the kits with combined bleach-fix (oh, ok, "blix") are conveniently available in reasonable sizes (excluding the Flexicolor kit for C41 from PF, but that's also quite expensive compared to the alternatives.)

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Develop, Color Develop, Blix - Ergo, 3 bath. At least that has been reported here over and over, and I tell them to use a stabilizer or final rinse as recommended by the film companies.

    Do you know for sure? I am only quoting a multitude of others seeking advice here and I am only referring to the 3 bath statement by the companies that make 3 bath E6 kits.

    Remember that these companies produce no film and do no extensive R&D. Kodak, Fuji, Agfa and Ilford are the R&D companies that do everything. I must say though that Fuji does little process R&D.

    PE
    Yes, I know for sure, since the only kit I use to develop E6 is the tetenal 3 bath kit that brings a "4th" bath that is the stabilizer! http://www.freestylephoto.biz/pdf/pr...structions.pdf

  7. #17
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    Tetenal "3-bath" E6 is in reality 4-bath, including stabilizer at the end of the process.

    Tetenal manufactures and sells some low-quality or unusable products, for example, their 2.5 liter "monoconcentrate" RA-4 kit. They even admitted the problem (after first denying it), and said they are working on it. This was somewhere in 2008.

    Hence, I'm not surprised that the OP has problems with their E6 kit.

    I occasionally had some small spots (blix iron deposits??) on bright areas such as skies when reusing Tetenal "3-bath" E6. Otherwise, the results were just fine, but I wouldn't trust it anymore. There are just too many "if"s.

  8. #18
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    They still make that monobath RA4AT? I had the same problems - we've discussed that here before. It isn't sold in the US that I'm aware of. I'm surprised they sell it anywhere if it still produces yellow whites like it did for me.

  9. #19
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    You cannot make a single part color developer or blix and you certainly cannot make a color monobath.

    PE

  10. #20
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    "Monoconcentrate" is another Tetenal misnomer, just like the "3-bath". Maybe it should read "monoconcentrates"

    It means that there is only one part instead of A+B, so only two bottles instead of four. Mixing is supposedly a lot more "easier". Let's compare!

    Developer:
    Traditional A+B: Add water. Measure and add A. Stir. Measure and add B. Stir. Good to go!
    "monoconcentrate". Heat up the bottle in a water bath for 10 minutes. Shake vigorously for 5 minutes, or until your arms are so tired you cannot anymore. Then shake some more, and you may have the separated layers mixed so that you can measure the concentrate. Oh yeah, it's so easy! (Against all odds, the developer always worked just fine for me. When used with a proper blix.)

    Blix:
    Traditional A+B: Add water. Measure and add A. Stir. Measure and add B. Stir. Good to go!
    "Monoconcentrate". Measure and mix with water. Yes, it's really easier to mix, you may save 30 seconds! Then you can spend hours of making prints which will look ugly with brown whites and muddy colors. And you can get prints that get darker in sunlight, a magical special effect! (Not.)

    I don't know if they make the product anymore. They claimed they are going to reformulate it after my complaint. Supposedly, I was being the first to ever complain about the product that has never worked at all.

    Luckily, they have not incorporated their groundbreaking "monoconcentrate" technology in their "3-bath" E6. Now that would be interesting.

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