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  1. #11

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    I think 800Z looks better rated at 640, especially in low light.

    For what it's worth, I think the two grainy shots look great; a really nice 'peppery' texture to them. I wonder if a soft filter would have added to the feel.

    I'll take your remaining 800Z off your hands, Ted, if you do decide to get rid of them. 800 speed film is my favourite, but I never shoot in low light.
    Steve.

  2. #12
    ted_smith's Avatar
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    OK, cool. I didn't realise I was underexposing so badly.

    Yeah, the metering was centre-weighted. They were just quick snapshots while on holiday so I didn't use my light meter.

    I always use the film at its box speed, so it looks like the rule of thumb for this film is use it at box speed if the light is "standard daylight" but set it to EI400 or 640 if low light (or switch to manual but for quick work like this, changing the EI seems like a good solution to me). Thanks all.
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ted_smith View Post
    OK, cool. I didn't realise I was underexposing so badly.

    Yeah, the metering was centre-weighted. They were just quick snapshots while on holiday so I didn't use my light meter.

    I always use the film at its box speed, so it looks like the rule of thumb for this film is use it at box speed if the light is "standard daylight" but set it to EI400 or 640 if low light (or switch to manual but for quick work like this, changing the EI seems like a good solution to me). Thanks all.
    Ted:

    Don't change the film speed as the level of light changes. If the light in and on the scene is even, and doesn't have a strong colour cast (such as from tungsten lights), then you should meter as usual.

    If the light in and on the scene is uneven, you need to be extra careful with your metering (to exclude the effects of things like windows in the background).

    And if your light source is different then daylight, you may want to add some exposure, but you may not - it is a subjective decision.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #14

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    Ted,

    I assume these are machine prints; machines often produce flat, grainy results like this from thin negs because they try to print detail that isn't there. Printed properly, the images should have dark shadows and proper highlights. I've done some jiggery-pokery in GIMP to illustrate; you'd get better results from scanning the negs, getting them hand-printed or printing them yourself.

    Cheers,
    kevs
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 52120010.JPG   52120014.JPG  
    Last edited by kevs; 04-08-2013 at 04:16 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: simplify text
    testing...

  5. #15

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    I've seen shadows like that many times. Blackish but with blue grains. As others have said, the film was underexposed. If you're scanning, you can fix this with curve-adjustments and noise-reduction in software, but that's a hassle. I prefer to rate Fuji 800 at EI 400 whenever possible. With a 50mm f/2 lens wide open shooting at 1/30 or 1/15, EI 400 should handle about everything indoors.

    Mark Overton

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