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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    Proper filtration for color balance applies to all color films.
    Well, of course it does, but different films have different response curves and impose different practical requirements to get an end result that you like. I read the OP as asking in essence "does Provia really respond that differently from Astia, and is it hard to compensate for the differences?", which seems like a perfectly valid question.

    In this day of, "I can fix anything in Fauxtoshop afterwards" it's positively amazing
    how much elementary photographic technique has been instantly forgotten. There must be a "delete from brain" function somewhere in that program.
    Where did that come from? I don't get the connection to this thread at all.

    I'm not sure "elementary photographic technique" as it relates to color temperature was ever all that widely understood. A fair number of people knew to use tungsten-balanced film or the corresponding filter indoors, but did even that much ever filter down into vernacular photography? I think since the 35mm boom of the 1970s, most people just used sunlight outdoors and flash indoors and never thought about color balance beyond "use the flash or it will look yellow".

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  2. #12
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Provia 100F has a bluish cast?
    That's entirely news to me after 20 years use! I use it side by side with Velvia 50 as conditions necessitate, even though the two palettes are poles apart.
    If you are working in shade on a bright, sunny day, Provia, like all E6 films, will throw up a cast. I don't believe in using filters to correct it; what I do believe is avoiding those conditions that cause the casts.

    If you're after the punch of Velvia with the additional speed, Velvia 100F might be worth trying; can still be bought as back-stock, at least here in Australia. However, I caution that it has a very oddball palette (a subject I have written about at length here and elsewhere) with peculiarly flat and pasty greens, unearthly yellows and browns but weighing up against it all very clear whites — and does not respond well under polarisation as Velvia 50.

    Provia is a soft palette and easygoing contrast. I would give it a try in conditions it is designed for (much more diverse than Velvia 50 or Astia) and come to your own conclusions.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  3. #13

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    There was a time when certain outdoors photographers were furious when Ektachrome 64 was
    discontinued and none of the newer films had that same wonderful blue cast! But in this case, I suspect
    it's due to trying to scan into the shadows and retrieve something that's not really there. Astia could be
    pulled about half a stop, as could Provia II (with some inevitable blocking up of the highlights). The
    current Provia III doesn't pull successfully. But given the fact that Astia was a relatively slow seller, I
    have little doubt that some of it was anything but fresh when used.

  4. #14
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    did even that much ever filter down into vernacular photography?
    So to speak...
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  5. #15
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    IIRC Henning once mentioned in a post a few months back that there would be the possibility for fuji to start making astia again given increasing sales of provia. For me provia is a lucrative alternative to astia in so much as it brings hope to the return of astia.

    But it all comes down to whether you gel with provia or not. I find my photography is more fluid when I know the tools i use (film/camera) will interpret the scene and subject in a way that i agree with the most. So in short, just give it a try!

  6. #16

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    Thanks Henning for mentioning the medium format results. These were new to me.

    I've been stocking up E100G as I was too late to the game to stock Astia up. E100G was the most suitable replacement from my personal impressions. If they would start to make Astia again, I'd probably resort to it as my main film immediately.

    Christian

  7. #17
    Lionel1972's Avatar
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    Big thanks to Henning for sharing the results of his extensive tests on slide film and for his support of color transparency films. Now that we know the current Precisa CT 200 is actually Provia 100F, I'm going to buy lots of it regularly. It's more than half the price of regular Provia 100F in 135 here. I'll have to try out Provia 100F for 4x5 portraits and compare it with what I get with Astia 100F. Most likely I'll end up using mostly Velvia for landscape, Provia 100F and Provia 400X for everyting else in the future. I love Provia 400X in 120. I wish Fuji would make RXP in 4x5 also, it would be great for handheld 4x5.

  8. #18
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
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    Nicely done Henning!
    [FONT="Arial Black"][/FONT]

  9. #19
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
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    Dear Henning,
    Thank you very much for your elaborate explanation! So I will order some Provia 100F to try it out...

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by ME Super View Post
    Provia 100F is definitely a good film, almost grainless, and it pushes well too. I shifted the EI of some from 100 to 320 and had the lab push 2 stops. It came out very nice indeed.

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum40/1...two-stops.html
    Hello friends,

    first of all, special thanks to Micheal, spatz, Christian, Lionel, Dave and Sebastian for your compliments.
    You are welcome!
    I am glad if my test results and experiences are helpful for you.

    @ ME Super:
    You say Provia 100F is almost grainless.
    Yes indeed.

    I permanently make 40x enlargements from 35mm film. That is about 1 meter x 1,5 meter:
    Every time when I project my slides, colour and BW on my big screen .
    From normal viewing distance I can't see any grain with Provia 100F.
    I have to go to the screen and have to 'put my nose' directly onto the screen to see grain, but even then it is extremely fine.
    The same is valid for Astia 100F, Sensia 100, Velvia 100, Velvia 100F, Elitechrome 100, Ektachrome 100G(X) (the differences in grain between these films are insignificant, Astia 100F having a tiny advantage).

    I well remember the Kodak booth at Photokina 2008, when Kodak introduced Ektar 100 (in 35mm only at that time) and displayed huge prints of 80 cm x 120 cm there.
    They looked very good, and very fine grained for an ISO 100/21° CN film.
    But they could not match the performance of 40x enlarged (1m x 1,5m) ISO 100/21° slide films like Provia 100F, Astia, Ektachrome E100G etc.. Not concerning fineness of grain, and especially not concerning sharpness and resolution. ISO 100/21° slide films are the benchmark for very big enlargements
    (the intensive further testing of Ektar we've done after Photokina 2008 and in the last years has confirmed that).

    By the way, Provia 400X gives excellent results at 40x enlargements in projection, too (35mm).
    Grain is invisible in structured details at normal viewing distances!
    Only in even zones (like sky) grain is visible, but it is very fine and not disturbing at all.
    Outstanding results for an ISO 400/27° color film (make a 1m x 1,5m enlargement from 35mm Portra 400, Pro 400H, Ultramax or Superia 400 X-Tra in comparison, and you immediately see what I mean).
    In the beginning to mid-nineties we were happy to have an ISO 200/21° film with such a performance, and now we have it with 4x the speed!

    Best regards,
    Henning

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