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  1. #31
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by redstarjedi View Post
    Hello. I've been reading this post and it made me join APUG! I recently used some provia 100f to test out my new 28mm lens for my contax G2. I'm disappointed in how cold all the shadows are, and how blue anything that is grey or silver becomes. Particularly asphalt, concrete or aluminum. Please see the attached photos. I wonder what filter i should use to correct this, in particular the train photo. Yes, i know i can "fix" it in photoshop. However i would like a accurate looking slide that every one here seems to speak of. I wonder if i should use a skylight 1A, 1B. Or even go more extreme and use a 81A, B, or C.





    Attachment 69184






    Attachment 69183 Attachment 69182

    81B filter. A skylight 1B (pale pink) also works. But also like most Fuji E6 films, Provia responds best in diffuse light. You are shooting in very bright light, with shadows, and E6 emulsions will give this cold, gaunt look when there is point light and shadow. It's not the film's fault, but your lack of preparation in the light. Next time, go out when it is overcast (the degree does not matter, so long as the light is diffuse). Shoot a roll of Provia and compare the results. It's one of those revelations I see on the faces of beginners asking me why "those expensive films" give a "horrible blue look". Education comes first, the working with the film, rather than against it.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  2. #32

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    Thanks for the info. I've looked back at some other provia 400x slides taken at a beach, and in a shaded Forrest. No blue casts, I think you are right that it's the time of day and my exposure. Since those beach and Forrest shots were done in the early afternoon, and the shots I provided were taken between 6pm-8pm. Would it be safe to say that I should use a 81B filter a few hours before the sun goes down?

  3. #33

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    After some practice your own eyes can easily detect color temperature issues well enough to know when some balancing might be needed.
    Time of day has little to do with it unless you further refine those parameters to weather conditions, altitude, latitude, time of year, etc.
    If you need to be precise, buy a good color temp meter. Enveloping atmosphere (like the coastal fogs around here) act like a softbox giving
    very even neutral illumination. An overcast cold gray sky is a completely different matter, and deep shade under a strong blue sky still another.
    You can judge the effect somewhat just by viewing your scene through respective filters. I'd recommend owning a good quality skylight filter
    (pale salmon color), an 81A and 81C. If you have extra budget you add an 81B and colorless UV filter. After that, it's just a matter of practice.

  4. #34
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by redstarjedi View Post
    Thanks for the info. I've looked back at some other provia 400x slides taken at a beach, and in a shaded Forrest. No blue casts, I think you are right that it's the time of day and my exposure. Since those beach and Forrest shots were done in the early afternoon, and the shots I provided were taken between 6pm-8pm. Would it be safe to say that I should use a 81B filter a few hours before the sun goes down?


    When the sun goes down there will be the normal bluish light of evening leading to darkness. You don't want to correct this really but it's a personal choice: Skylight 1B (pink) or 81B to lift it a little, but the effect will still be contrived as the light at the time is natural, in the same way as the preglow and burnished orange to red of daybreak, another time when bluish light will be experienced (before the sun rises). Many photographers exploit the evening light after sunset e.g. with tungsten film, giving a rich blue interpretation.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  5. #35

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    Doing deliberate color errors with chrome film is easier than with color negs, simply because you can instantly review the result on a lightbox to
    see if you like it or not. Exploiting excessive blue has been popular for a long time with slides, but not with negs, where people seem to enjoy
    different categories of error. Experiment. Have fun.

  6. #36
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    It doesn't make sense to me to say "just shoot slide film in overcast light." Or rather, it wouldn't make sense if we had a selection of slide films. Some of us still shoot slides for projection, and shoot them to record memorable times and events, which don't all happen to occur in diffuse light. Astia handled contrastier lighting much better. E100G did pretty well, and going a few years farther back so did Kodachrome.

    The closest thing to an alternative to Astia I've found now that E100G is also discontinued is...Provia, but Provia 400. Yes, it's quite a bit grainier, amazingly good for a 400 speed slide film but still nothing like the fine grain we've come to expect from 400 negative film. But if you can live with the grain, which I often can for projection, it seems to be considerably lower in contrast and saturation than Provia 100. It's a really good film. It's even worth what it costs these days.

  7. #37

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    My next roll i'll try to recreate the shots i posted above. But use a 81B filter and then a skylight 1b filter and post the examples.

    Thanks for everyone's advice.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    It doesn't make sense to me to say "just shoot slide film in overcast light."
    Me neither. I do love its behavior in overcast light, but I've shot lots and lots of Provia 100F in full sun and I think of that as sort of its natural habitat. I do use an 81B routinely, because otherwise shadows tend to look too blue---it may be accurate but it looks wrong to the viewer---but that seems like a small price to pay compared to "don't shoot on sunny days"!

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  9. #39
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    It's not that "it doesn't make sense" in that I disagree that it works best in diffuse light and doesn't handle contrasty lighting well. That does make sense, but it doesn't help when faced with an outdoor middle of the day glaring sun family or friend activity I want to record for projection. Then it's "do the best one can" and, ideally, choose a film accordingly but all the mid contrast and less contrasty slide films are gone. Best I can do is Provia 400, which is fast for that light but quite workable, albeit usually without the option of opening up to blur backgrounds.

  10. #40
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    It's not my problem when amateurs go writing angry letters to Fujifilm complaining about "your stupid film!" because they loaded a roll of Velvia and exposed it at noon with everything blocked and blown like there's no tomorrow. Good for Fuji that they summarily delete such diatribes. Letters are even being written to retailers complaining. A few twats does not a good review for film maketh.

    Part of the problem is a profound lack of education and the other is the limited range of films we have. We are saddled with E6 and its inherently high contrast, but the results we can achieve can be better or worse depending on the format of the film (35mm generally is more difficult, 120 and LF easier by way of metering). This contrast issue is what causes so much distress to people not switched on about how to get the best results from it. Again, quite a bit of my time is spent explaining at length spot metering (not incident!) technique to tip-toe around the chasm of contrasty extremes; this is critical with Velvia (sometimes also Provia) if people are going to expose it in bright sunlight with shadows: competent additive spot metering will get you over the line, holding shadows and highlights marvellously because you are working within the range of Velvia (a narrow 3 stops), but you've got to know your stuff to take the risk. Of course, amateurs with their bells-'n-whistles, wings-'n-things' all singing and dancing SLRs think the onboard meters will work the mojo with Velvia.Sometimes they do. A lot of time they don't, and you can hear them screaming and hissing. I exposed Velvia in the most God-awful conditions imaginable when I first started with it a good 20 years ago. I did the same with Provia photographing groups with Rotary. I alternated between RVP and RDP, experimenting with light and scenery, tone and contrast. Provia is a good general purpose film but it too can suffer extremes of cast and contrast (the cold blue look is one of its characteristics, but looks tame compared to Velvia). It is the first choice for shooting in contrasty conditions if you know what you are doing. I don't let one type of film dictate how I shoot: I work around it with metering, photographing in any conditions, but the best results are obtained in diffuse light, as legions of established landscape professionals will attest, not just me!

    There is a bit of rocket science involved and generally (but not always) the design intent of diffuse illumination exposure is ideal — the results will be predictable and consistent, even with polarisation (assuming you know what this does to Velvia, Provia, and why, but more importantly, how much is too much and when not to use it). Two weeks ago I shot a roll of RVP in 120 format in shadow and bright sun — I had to, no choice and no sweat! The meter told me how extreme things were getting until everything was smoothed out with additive and duplex metering. I cannot stress enough the need for people here to understand selective/discriminate metering with E6 emulsions, and not rely lblithely on camera meters to do with difficult work for them. Funny that the day after my shoot it rained and rained and rained and would have been "sort of" ideal for Provia or Velvia, but with the flat lighting requiring additional exposure.

    So, there's a lot to learn about E6 films and their behaviour, and making do with the limited choices we have. But it's no good crying foul when things go pear-shaped in challenging conditions. It's up to you to learn how to tame these Vaudevillian emulsions.
    Last edited by Poisson Du Jour; 05-26-2013 at 07:03 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






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